On Wednesday the FBI released a final report to the 9/11 Review Commission. “I am pleased the Review Commission recognized the significant progress we have made to build a threat-based, intelligence-driven law enforcement and national security organization,” said FBI Director James B. Comey.

It states the FBI must concentrate on sharing information with other law enforcement agencies and the government at a time of emerging new threats such as the Islamic State and the flow of Westerners joining militant fighters in Syria, according to the Associated Press.

“These threats are not just knocking on the door. They’re in the room,” said former Rep. Timothy Roemer, a member of the original 9/11 commission. Edwin Meese, a former Attorney General under Reagan, is also a member of the commission.

Information sharing, according to the commissioners, has helped prevent “another catastrophic terrorist attack.” The report argues the agency must concentrate on building human intelligence programs.

Human Intelligence, or HUMINT, is intelligence collected through interpersonal contact as opposed to signals intelligence. Its methodology was developed by the U.S. military and relies on interviews and interrogation.

The FBI “has assigned analysts, including reports officers, and human intelligence (HUMINT) collectors to the field. It has introduced a well-conceived, entity-wide threat prioritization process,” according to the report.

Interrogating Suspects to Death and Inventing Terror Plots

In 2014, the FBI sent human intelligence collectors to interrogate Ibragim Todashev, said to be a friend of suspected Boston Bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was reportedly killed by the police during a shoot-out. The interview resulted in FBI agents shooting Todashev to death.

Khasuen Taramov, a friend of Todashev, told CNN affiliate Florida News 13 that prior to the shooting Todashev told him he felt “like there’s going to be a setup … bad setup against him. Because he told me, ‘They are making up such crazy stuff, I don’t know … why they doing it. OK, I’m answering the questions, but they are still making up some, like, connections, some crazy stuff. I don’t know why they are doing it.’ ”

FBI interrogations are geared toward forcing suspects to make false statements and then prosecuting then. The tactic is used when the FBI does not have enough evidence to get a conviction.

“In post-9/11, the FBI famously went to what they call the ‘Al Capone’ strategy, in which they were going to prosecute people they suspected of terrorism for anything they could find,” Mike German, a former FBI agent and current fellow at New York University’s School of Law, told Vocativ. “That’s fine if they guess right and are going after terrorists, but I found in my law enforcement career that often when you couldn’t prove somebody was a terrorist, it was because they weren’t a terrorist.”

In addition to harassing and intimidating supposed terror suspects and, in the case of Todashev, killing them, the FBI is notorious for creating terror plots which are then used to push the war on terror narrative in the corporate media.

A report released by Mother Jones and the Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California-Berkley concludes the FBI is responsible for creating most terror plots in the United States.

The FBI “has made a business of approaching likely candidates and grooming them to carry out terror attacks,” writes Tony Cartalucci.

The implications are of course, with the FBI’s current nationwide stable of patsies being trained, directed, and provided material support to carry out attacks the FBI then “foils,” is at any given moment, any one of these operations can be switched “live” just as in 1993. The resulting carnage can then be used to manipulate public opinion just as it was in 1993, 2001, on 7/7 in London, and in Madrid, Spain in 2004.

“Americans have been told that their government is keeping them safe by preventing and prosecuting terrorism inside the US,” Andrea Prasow, deputy Washington director at Human Rights Watch, noted in a report issued by Human Rights Watch and Columbia Law School’s Human Rights Institute. “But take a closer look and you realize that many of these people would never have committed a crime if not for law enforcement encouraging, pressuring, and sometimes paying them to commit terrorist acts.”

The FBI and the Justice Department are immune to criticism and continue to defend the FBI tactic of inventing terror and coercing often mentally unstable individuals into imaginary terror plots.

“These operations are conducted with extraordinary care and precision, ensuring that law enforcement officials are accountable for the steps they take — and that suspects are neither entrapped nor denied legal protections,” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said in July, 2014. He said FBI undercover operations are “essential in fighting terrorism.”

The commission report directs the FBI to expand its current operations and produce more suspicious terror plots which will then be exploited by an ongoing propaganda campaign to convince the American people they face a serious international terror threat and increasingly threats posed by lone wolves radicalized by fanatical Muslims at home.

Propaganda and the specter of lone wolves lurking in the shadows — lone wolves and terrorists conceived by the FBI domestically and the CIA abroad — are essential if the state is going to maintain its war of terror and realize its political goals at home — an all-encompassing high-tech police state — and internationally: fighting manufactured and illusory enemies that permit the extension of a corporate empire into vital geostrategic regions, particularly the Middle East and Africa.


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