Rest in Peace, Terri
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Infowars Teri Schiavo Archive:

The Aftermath of Terri Schiavo's Brutal Murder

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The Living Bill of Rights

Media Denied Access to Schiavo DCF Records

Fake Terri Schiavo Autopsy Photos Circulate Internet

New Polls Disprove Contention Americans Wanted Terri To Die

Planned Parenthood Thanks Anti-Terri GOP Voters


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Terri Schiavo Dies, Michael Schiavo Prevents "Begging Parents" From Seeing Her Last Moments

Michael Schiavo Won't Even Allow Terri's Parents To Attend Her Funeral

Death fuels family feud

Is hospice industry part of the right-to-die crusade?

Former Nurse Says "Terri was not completely out of it"

Agency Had 89 Abuse Reports on Schiavo

Some See Link in Deaths of Pope, Schiavo

COMMENT:
This is the so-called compassion that was shown to Terri. Her parents begged to see her and Michael Schiavo refused them access. Dehydrated and starved to death, Terri was denied the comfort of having her parents by her side in her last moments.

 

 

Terri Schiavo's Struggle

MULTIMEDIA

ABC Action News - Life and the battle to save Terri (05/19/04)
Part two here

Coma Survivor supports Terri (10/15/03)

New Video of Terri (10/14/03)


FLASHBACK

Santorum Vows to Save Terri Schiavo

Making Way for Terri Schiavo's Murder

Has collusion been a factor in the Terri Schiavo case?

Michael Schiavo Threatens Legal Action if Terri Videos are not removed From Website

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Terri Schiavo Dies, Michael Schiavo Prevents "Begging Parents" From Seeing Her Last Momennts

CodeBlueBlog Issues $100,000 Challenge to Terri Schiavo Neurologist Experts

Terri's brother: Felos in love with death

Cremation & No Autopsy Planned for Terri Schiavo

Compassion lacking in Schiavo case

Nazis Used Starvation to Kill

Judge Won't Order Schiavo Tube Reinserted

Terri Fate Rests on Judge's Ruling After Political Maneuvering

Infowars.com | March 21, 2005

First of all, please go visit terrisfight.org to see just how brain-damaged Terri Schiavo is. She opens her eyes on request, reacts to her mother's attention and responds to music.

Not that that matters. Terri matters. Life matters.

The dehumanist culture of death wants you to believe that it is alright and "humane" to "euthanize" the injured, the brain-damaged and the terminally ill.

The horror of Terri's case illustrates The degree of sickness to which the dehumanization has evolved. Terri's husband wants her out of the way and wants to starve her to death. Terri who recognizes and knows her mother.

The court thinks that is fine and has now removed the stay making the murder possible. All throughout the mainstream media you see reports of how brain damaged Terri is and "who knows if her reactions are real or just reflex impulses?"

We're convinced they're not, but even if they were, should she be murdered for being injured and ill when her parents and friends are desperately trying to defend the gift of life she has been given?

Take heed of this horrific precedent and do what you can to help save Terri.

 

Appeals Court Invites Additional Schiavo Review

Associated Press | March 30, 2005

PINELLAS PARK, Fla. - In a rare legal victory for Terri Schiavo's parents, a federal appeals court agreed to consider their request for a new hearing on whether to reconnect their severely brain-damaged daughter's feeding tube.

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta issued a written ruling without comment late Tuesday granting the emergency motion, but did not indicate when it would consider rehearing the case. Last week, the same court twice ruled against Schiavo's parents, who are trying to keep their daughter alive.

Time was running out for Schiavo, however. Bob Schindler described his daughter as "failing" on Tuesday, her 12th day without nourishment.

"She still looks pretty darn good under the circumstances," Schindler said. "You can see the impact of no food and water for 12 days. Her bodily functions are still working. We still have her."

Doctors have said Schiavo, 41, would probably die within a week or two of the tube being removed.

The request for a new hearing also asks to have the tube reinserted immediately "in light of the magnitude of what is at stake and the urgency of the action required."

Vigil continues
Tuesday's decision was a ray of hope for the Schindlers, who have lost a string of court battles over their daughter's fate. The case has wound its way through six courts for seven years; the U.S. Supreme Court declined to intervene five times.

Protesters keeping a 24-hour vigil outside the hospice praised the latest order.

"There's a chance for a miracle," said Christine Marriott, 43, who rushed to the hospice after hearing the news on TV. "Anything positive is a breath of life."

Terri Schiavo's feeding tube was removed March 18 on a court order sought by her husband, Michael, who contends she wouldn't want to be kept alive artificially. She suffered catastrophic brain damage in 1990 when her heart stopped for several minutes because of a chemical imbalance apparently brought on by an eating disorder.

But the Schindlers have maintained that their daughter would want to be kept alive. On Tuesday, they asked the appeals court to consider their request for a new hearing based on the seven-year history of evidence in the case, rather than whether previous Florida court rulings have met legal standards under state law.

The request contends that the federal court in Tampa had "committed plain error when it reviewed only the state court case and outcome history."

Attorneys for the Schindlers have argued that Terri Schiavo's rights to life and privacy were being violated.

Attorneys for the Schindlers and Michael Schiavo didn't immediately return phone messages early Wednesday.

"I think the courts want to be sure that there's no accusation that any legal argument was ignored," said attorney Neal Sonnett, former chairman of the American Bar Association's criminal justice section.

Federal courts were given jurisdiction to review Schiavo's case after Republicans in Congress pushed through unprecedented emergency legislation aimed at prolonging Schiavo's life. But federal courts at two have levels rebuffed the family.

On Tuesday, Mary Schindler made a terse but emotional appeal to Michael Schiavo: "Michael and Jodi, you have your own children. Please, please give my child back to me." Michael Schiavo and fiancee Jodi Centonze have two children, born long after Terri Schiavo's collapse.

Although supporters of the Schindlers have claimed the dehydrated woman is being denied comforts such as ice chips for her dry mouth or balm for chapped lips, George Felos, the husband's attorney, defended how Schiavo is being cared for.

"Obviously, the parents and the siblings are desperate. Desperation may lead to different perceptions," Felos told CNN. "I can only tell you what I've seen, and Terri is dying a very peaceful, cared-for death."

Jesse Jackson, Laura Bush weigh in
The Rev. Jesse Jackson prayed with the Schindlers on Tuesday and joined conservatives in calling for state lawmakers to order her feeding tube reinserted.

The former Democratic presidential candidate was invited by Schiavo's parents to meet with activists outside Schiavo's hospice. His arrival was greeted by some applause and cries of "This is about civil rights!"

"I feel so passionate about this injustice being done, how unnecessary it is to deny her a feeding tube, water, not even ice to be used for her parched lips," he said. "This is a moral issue and it transcends politics and family disputes."

First lady Laura Bush also commented on the case Tuesday, saying the government was right to have intervened on behalf of Schiavo.

"It is a life issue that really does require government to be involved," Bush said aboard a plane bound for Afghanistan, where she was to promote education and women's rights.

During Jackson's visit, a man was tackled to the ground by officers when he tried to storm into the hospice, police said. He became the 47th protester arrested since the feeding tube was removed. The man had two bottles of water with him but did not reach the hospice door, police said.

On Tuesday, the Schindlers had lost a round in the courts when an appeals court upheld a previous ruling by Pinellas Circuit Judge George Greer that blocked the Department of Children and Families from intervening in the case.


Court to Weigh Schiavo Emergency Motion

Associated Press | March 30, 2005
By RON WORD

PINELLAS PARK, Fla. (AP) - A federal appeals court agreed to consider an emergency bid by Terri Schiavo's parents for a new hearing on whether to reconnect her feeding tube, raising their fading hopes of keeping the severely brain-damaged woman alive.

In its order late Tuesday, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals didn't say when it would decide whether to grant the hearing. It was not clear what effect reconnecting Terri Schiavo's feeding tube would have on her, as she approached her 13th day without nourishment.

The order issued allowed Bob and Mary Schindler to file the appeal, even though the court had set a March 26 deadline for doing so.

Its one-sentence order said: "The Appellant's emergency motion for leave to file out of time is granted." Twice last week, the court ruled against the Schindlers.

In requesting a new hearing, the Schindlers argued that a federal judge in Tampa should have considered the entire state court record and not whether previous Florida court rulings met legal standards under state law. It also stated that the Atlanta federal appellate court didn't consider whether there was enough "clear and convincing" evidence that Terri Schiavo would have chosen to die in her current condition.

Attorneys for the Schindlers didn't immediately return phone messages Wednesday. George Felos, Michael Schiavo's attorney, declined comment.

Time was running out for Schiavo, however. Bob Schindler described his daughter on Tuesday as "failing."

"She still looks pretty darn good under the circumstances," Schindler said. "You can see the impact of no food and water for 12 days. Her bodily functions are still working. We still have her."

Doctors have said Schiavo, 41, would probably die within two weeks after the tube was removed March 18. Her husband, Michael Schiavo, insists he is carrying out her wishes by having the feeding tube pulled.

The request for a new hearing also asks to have the tube reinserted immediately "in light of the magnitude of what is at stake and the urgency of the action required."

The order was a ray of hope for the Schindlers, who are battling their son-in-law over their daughter's fate. The case has wound its way through six courts for seven years; the U.S. Supreme Court declined to intervene five times.

Protesters keeping a 24-hour vigil outside the hospice praised the latest decision.

"There's a chance for a miracle," said Christine Marriott, 43, who rushed to the hospice after hearing the news on TV. "Anything positive is a breath of life."

Early Wednesday, a man was arrested when he tried to bring a plastic cup of water into the hospice. Officers stopped him at the gate as he shouted: "You don't know God from Godzilla!"

He became the 48th protester arrested since the tube was removed on a court order sought by her husband. Terri Schiavo suffered catastrophic brain damage in 1990 when her heart stopped for several minutes because of a chemical imbalance apparently brought on by an eating disorder.

The Schindlers have maintained that their daughter would want to be kept alive.

Their attorneys raised the issue of the new request after a Saturday deadline set by the court, saying they have had more time to research the issues and have become convinced that the federal court in Tampa had "committed plain error when it reviewed only the state court case and outcome history."

Attorneys for the Schindlers have argued that Terri Schiavo's rights to life and privacy were being violated.

"I think the courts want to be sure that there's no accusation that any legal argument was ignored," said attorney Neal Sonnett, former chairman of the American Bar Association's criminal justice section.

Federal courts were given jurisdiction to review Schiavo's case after Republicans in Congress pushed through unprecedented emergency legislation aimed at prolonging her life. But federal courts at three levels have rebuffed her parents.

On Tuesday, her mother, Mary Schindler, made a terse but emotional appeal to Michael Schiavo: "Michael and Jodi, you have your own children. Please, please give my child back to me." Michael Schiavo and fiancee Jodi Centonze have two children, born long after Terri Schiavo's collapse.

Although supporters of the Schindlers have claimed the dehydrated woman is being denied comforts such as ice chips for her dry mouth or balm for chapped lips, Felos defended how Schiavo is being cared for.

"Obviously, the parents and the siblings are desperate. Desperation may lead to different perceptions," Felos told CNN. "I can only tell you what I've seen, and Terri is dying a very peaceful, cared-for death."

The Rev. Jesse Jackson prayed with the Schindlers on Tuesday and joined conservatives in calling for state lawmakers to order her feeding tube reinserted.

The former Democratic presidential candidate was invited by Schiavo's parents to meet with activists outside Schiavo's hospice. His arrival was greeted by some applause and cries of "This is about civil rights!"

"I feel so passionate about this injustice being done, how unnecessary it is to deny her a feeding tube, water, not even ice to be used for her parched lips," he said. "This is a moral issue and it transcends politics and family disputes."

First lady Laura Bush also commented on the case Tuesday, saying the government was right to have intervened on behalf of Schiavo.

"It is a life issue that really does require government to be involved," Bush said aboard a plane bound for Afghanistan, where she was promoting education and women's rights.


Terri's brother: Felos in love with death
Strange passages from attorney's book raise questions about Terri's case

World Net Daily | March 29, 2005

"I think Mr. Felos has some infatuation with death."

That's what Bobby Schindler, brother of Terri's Schiavo, now in her 12th day of court-ordered starvation, said on Fox News' "Hannity and Colmes" last night.

He was commenting on claims made by attorney George Felos, long-time counsel of Terri's estranged husband Michael Schiavo, that Terri looked "beautiful" as she lay dying.

While virtually all other eyewitnesses described the dying brain-injured woman as "gaunt," "drawn," "struggling" and "fighting like hell" for life, Felos described Terri as "beautiful" and "peaceful" to reporters during a Saturday press conference:

"She is calm, she is peaceful, she is resting comfortably. ... Her lips are not chapped, they're not bleeding. Her skin's not peeling. Frankly when I saw her ... she looked beautiful. In all the years I've seen Mrs. Schiavo, I've never seen such a look of peace and beauty upon her."

Following the controversial press conference, TV pundits debated the propriety of Felos's remarks and his unusual characterization of a person starving to death as emanating "beauty."

One explanation for Felos' comments is suggested in the attorney's own 2002 book, "Litigation As Spiritual Practice." In one passage, Felos, a longtime volunteer hospice worker, says he promised one patient he would "do everything in my power" to bring her life to an end.

The patient was Estelle Browning, focal point of a landmark "right-to-die" case. Browning, profoundly debilitated by a stroke, had been confined to a nursing home for over a year and a half when Mrs. Herbert, her cousin and caregiver, sought to have Browning's feeding tube removed, in accordance with her living will. Felos took the case.

Recalling his first encounter with Browning, Felos writes: "'Mrs. Browning, do you want to die? ... Do you want to die?' – I near shouted as I continued to peer into her pools of strikingly beautiful but incognizant blue. It was so eerie. Her eyes were wide open and crystal clear, but instead of the warmth of lucidity, they burned with the ice of expressionlessness."

In Chapter 8, titled "Soul-Speak," Felos describes a psychic communication between him and the "vegetative" Browning, during which he promised to "help" her leave this earthly life. The narrative describes a strange, spiritual experience of some sort:

As I continued to stay beside Mrs. Browning at her nursing home bed, I felt my mind relax and my weight sink into the ground. I began to feel light-headed as I became more reposed. Although feeling like I could drift into sleep, I also experienced a sense of heightened awareness. As Mrs. Browning lay motionless before my gaze, I suddenly heard a loud, deep moan and scream and wondered if the nursing home personnel heard it and would respond to the unfortunate resident. In the next moment, as this cry of pain and torment continued, I realized it was Mrs. Browning.
I felt the mid-section of my body open and noticed a strange quality to the light in the room. I sensed her soul in agony. As she screamed I heard her say, in confusion, 'Why am I still here … why am I here?' My soul touched hers and in some way I communicated that she was still locked in her body. I promised I would do everything in my power to gain the release her soul cried for. With that the screaming immediately stopped. I felt like I was back in my head again, the room resumed its normal appearance, and Mrs. Browning, as she had throughout this experience, lay silent.

I knew without a doubt what had transpired was real and dispelled the thought as intellect’s attempt to assert its own version of reality.

Despite saturation press coverage of the Terri Schiavo case, Felos's New Age spirituality has not emerged as an issue. However, as Richard Land, head of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission said to the St. Petersburg Times, the Terri Schiavo case represents a "clash of two very disparate civilizations – the Judeo-Christian civilization, which is based upon the sanctity of human life, and the neopagan, relativist, quality-of-life civilization."

Adds James A. Smith Sr., executive editor of the Florida Baptist Witness: "Both worldviews are in play in the Schiavo debate and it's long past time for the public to understand this."


Cremation & No Autopsy Planned for Terri Schiavo
Its Obvious Michael is Hiding Something

NewsMax | March 28, 2005

Michael Schiavo has taken steps that will prevent investigators from examining Terri Schiavo's body for evidence of abuse after she dies – a suspicion her family has repeatedly raised as her death grows more imminent.

Schiavo's attorney George Felos told the Washington Post on Friday that Terri will be cremated and buried in a plot owned by Michael's family in Pennsylvania.

Terri's parents had filed a request with the court to block the cremation plans, saying it would violate the religious beliefs of their daughter, who was a practicing a Catholic.

But as with every other motion filed in the case on behalf of Bob and Mary Schindler, the Florida courts have rejected the request.

A 1991 bone scan performed on Terri Schiavo showed unexplained injuries to her vertebrae and legs.

Terri's brother, Bobby Schindler, told Fox News Channel's "Hannity & Colmes" on Thursday that a doctor has testified that she might have been strangled before she was found unconscious in her home in February 1990.


'Death is imminent' for Terri Schiavo
Schiavo Receives Last Rites, Communion

Associated Press | March 28, 2005
By MARK LONG

PINELLAS PARK, Fla. - Terri Schiavo was given last rites and Easter communion - a drop of wine, but no bread - as protesters hoping to get the brain-damaged woman's feeding tube reinserted pledged to take their fight to the gates of the White House.

Neither Schiavo's parents nor her husband offered new, specific details on her condition, but one of the two priests who visited her hospital room said her ``death is imminent'' - a devastating proclamation for those who spent Easter Sunday praying for a woman they never knew.

``We are Terri's voice. Right now, Terri is fighting for her life,'' the Rev. Patrick Mahoney angrily shouted Sunday, his face reddening. He pledged to protest outside the White House on Monday.

Fewer than 10 protesters stayed overnight Monday in rain and wind. One man was arrested before dawn trying to take a jug of water to Schiavo.

Schiavo's mother, Mary Schindler, did not visit her daughter on Easter, emotions keeping her from the hospice for the first time since Terri's feeding tube was removed 10 days ago, said Paul O'Donnell, a Roman Catholic Franciscan monk and a family spokesman.

``If she goes in there again, we might have to take her to the hospital,'' O'Donnell said.

But the woman's parents claimed one Easter victory: Schiavo's husband, Michael, allowed her to receive communion wine.

As her brother, sister and brother-in-law watched, the Rev. Thaddeus Malanowski held Terri's right hand as he and the hospice priest, the Rev. Joseph Braun, placed the droplet on her tongue. Malanowski also anointed her with holy oil, offered a blessing and absolved her of sin.

``She received the blood of Christ,'' said Malanowski, adding he could not give her a fleck of communion bread because her tongue was too dry.

Tensions were noticeably heightened both among the protesters and, apparently, among the closest confidants to the woman's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler. David Gibbs III, their lead lawyer, told CBS' ``Face the Nation'' that Schiavo has ``passed where physically she would be able to recover.''

``In the family's opinion, that is absolutely not true,'' spokesman Randall Terry said outside the hospice.

The Schindler family, also bothered by repeated arrests and heightened anger outside the hospice, pleaded with supporters to spend Easter with their families. They had little success; five people were arrested and chants of ``Give Terri water!'' echoed for much of the day.

Extra police officers blocked the road in front of Schiavo's hospice and Pinellas County school officials said an elementary school next to the hospice would be closed Monday.

At least two more state-filed appeals are pending, but those challenges are before the state 2nd District Court of Appeal, which has rebuffed Gov. Jeb Bush's previous efforts in the case.

Doctors have said Terri Schiavo, 41, would probably die within a week or two once the feeding tube - which kept her alive for 15 years - was disconnected. She relied on the tube since suffering catastrophic brain damage when her heart stopped beating and oxygen was cut off to her brain.

At Michael Schiavo's Clearwater home, protesters dropped roses and Easter lilies on his lawn - a peaceful protest interrupted when sprinklers came on.

His fiancee's brother picked up the flowers and handed them to a bystander to take away. John Centonze declined to answer questions, only saying that Michael Schiavo was ``very upset.''

During Easter services at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Clearwater, the Rev. Ted Costello avoided mentioning the Schiavo case. Yet at Faith Lutheran Church in Dunedin, the Rev. Peter Kolb thought Schiavo's story was appropriate for his sermon. ``One day, we're all going to go through the valley,'' Kolb told churchgoers.

And some protesters continued demanding that the governor, but Bush told CNN he cannot ignore numerous state and federal court rulings against intervention. ``I don't have powers ... that would allow me to intervene after a decision has been made,'' he said.

Gibbs told CBS he believed Bush has done all he could. ``Gov. Bush has been a real friend,'' he said.

Schiavo's parents dispute that their daughter is in a persistent vegetative state as court-ordered doctors have determined. Michael Schiavo contends his wife told him she would not want to be kept alive artificially.


Family advisor: Schiavo reacted to friend's visit

Miami Herald | March 28, 2005
BY NOAH BIERMAN

PINELLAS PARK -Terri Schiavo had an ''extraordinary'' reaction to a friend's Sunday night visit, her parents' spokesman claimed Monday morning.

Friar Paul O'Donnell, spiritual advisor to Bob and Mary Schindler, said Schiavo received a visit from her father and friend Sunday night. When the friend, identified as Sherry, recalled their days dancing and partying together, Schiavo ''raised her hands up and was moving and started making gutteral sounds like she does when she talks to her mother,'' O'Donnell said.

Doctors have concluded that Schiavo is in a persistent vegetative state and that apparent reactions to loved ones are reflective. Supporters of the Schindlers are still hoping Florida Gov. Jeb Bush will intervene to replace a feeding tube that has kept Schiavo alive the last 15 years.

O'Donnell and other family spokesmen have been making regular pleads to replace the tube since it was removed 10 days ago.

''Everyone is willing to write this woman's obituary except one person and that's Terri Schiavo,'' O'Donnell said.

The courts have ruled that Schiavo did not wish to stay alive through artificial feeding. Gov. Bush has said there is no more he can do.


Child Arrested Trying To Bring Water To Terri Schiavo

The Australian | March 24, 2005

POLICE today handcuffed and led away three children and seven adults who tried to take water into the hospice where brain-damaged Terri Schiavo is being cared for.

With mounting international attention on the Schiavo right-to-die battle, activists gathered outside the hospice after a federal appeals court became the latest to turn down attempts by Mrs Schiavo's parents to get a feeding tube lifeline reinstalled.

The tube was taken out on Saturday. The 41-year-old woman has been in what doctors call a persistent vegetative state for 15 years.

Her husband says she did not want to be kept alive artificially and should be allowed to die. Her parents say Mrs Schiavo's condition could improve with treatment.

The demonstrators, who were carrying cups of water, refused to move off the property of the Woodside hospice in Pinellas Park, Florida, and were led away one-by-one by police, handcuffed and put in a police van.

Some read messages for Mrs Schiavo before being handcuffed. Others knelt on the ground.

One 14-year-old girl and two brothers aged 12 and 10 were among the 10 people taken away by police.

"I am proud of them," said the boys' mother Geilen Keys from Texas. "They are very mature and they said 'we want to go and offer some water to Terri'."

Another woman was arrested for staging a similar protest yesterday.


Nurse: Michael tried to kill Terri
Former caregiver asserts husband 'doesn't want the truth to be known'

World Net Daily | March 23 2005

Michael Schiavo once tried to kill his wife Terri with insulin shots, according to a former caregiver for the brain-injured Florida woman.

The estranged husband -- who is living with another woman with whom he has two children -- "wants her to die; he doesn't want the truth to be known," said Carla Sauer Iyer in an interview this morning on the Fox News Channel program "Fox and Friends."

WorldNetDaily reported the registered nurse's testimony in 2003 when it was presented in a 24-page complaint filed in a federal lawsuit alleging Michael Schiavo had forbidden medical professionals to provide his wife with any therapy or rehabilitation and had attempted to hasten her death while she was a patient at the Pinellas Park, Fla., hospice she has lived in since 2000.

After Terri Schiavo's collapse in 1990 under disputed circumstances, Michael Schiavo won a malpractice lawsuit, promising to use the money for her therapy. Afterward, however, he requested a "do not resuscitate" order, refused therapy and barred stimulation and treatment for infections.

Michael Schiavo believes the collapse, during which oxygen temporarily was cut off to the brain, was the result of an eating disorder, but her parents suspect he tried to strangle her.

Iyer said in the FNC interview that when Terri Schiavo was having a urinary tract infection, Michael Schiavo "would be excited, thrilled, even hoping that she would die soon."

"What makes you say that?" Iyer was asked.

"He would blurt out 'When is she gonna die? When is that B-I-T-C-H gonna die? Hasn't she died yet?'"

A federal judge early this morning refused to order reinsertion of Terri Schiavo's feeding tube after emergency intervention by Congress and President Bush.

The tube was removed Friday afternoon after Florida courts rejected a flurry of motions by Robert and Mary Schindler to keep their daughter alive.

In a 13-page ruling, U.S. District Judge James Whittemore of Tampa said the 41-year-old woman's parents had not established a "substantial likelihood of success" at trial on the merits of their arguments.

'Help me'

In her sworn affidavit, Iyer, who cared for Terri Schiavo from April 1995 until August of 1996, stated Terri used to talk to her as much as she could and frequently used what sounded like the word "pain." She also interpreted Terri's vocalizing at times as crying "help me."

In contrast, the courts are operating on the finding of fact that Terri Schiavo is in a "persistant vegetative state" and does not intentionally respond to stimuli. The Schindlers insist that while Terri is severely handicapped, she recognizes them and interacts with laughter, crying, moans and attempts to form words.

Iyer says she was fired after notifying police about her suspicions.

While acknowledging she had no proof, the nurse said she suspects Michael Schiavo injected Terri, who normally has "very stable" blood sugar levels, with regular insulin to drive her into hypoglycemic shock during his visits.

"Terri would be trembling, crying hysterically and would be very pale and have cold sweats," Iyer wrote. "So I'd check her blood sugar. The glucometer reading would be so low that it was below the range where it would register an actual number reading."

Schiavo repeatedly and strenuously has denied allegations of abuse. Felos described the accusations as "a bunch of garbage." He called caregivers' claims Terri spoke to them "a fabrication."

In the Fox News Channel interview today, Iyer said she saw needle marks under Terri Schiavo's breast and groin after Michael Schiavo had been left in the closed room with her. A used syringe was found in the trash.

Iyer said that when Michael Schiavo found out she and another nurse were feeding Terri liquids and liquified foods, he warned he would get them fired if they didn't stop.

These facts were not taken into consideration in the court cases, Iyer stated.

" ... I think a gag order was put on all confidence things Terri had done," Iyer said.

One of the Schindlers' legal roadblocks is that in the original hearings more than 10 years ago, they followed the advice of a lawyer who had them agree to stipulate that Terri was in a "persistant vegetative state."

Subsequently, they provided the court with "reams of medical evidence" indicating Terri could be rehabilitated, but the court would not consider it because of the stipulation, according to a spokesman, Gary McCullough.

"It was a huge error on the part of lawyers at the front end," he said.


Nurse: Terri Can Eat Normally

Newsmax/Carl Limbacher | March 21, 2005

A certified nursing assistant who cared for Terri Schiavo in 1997 filed a sworn affidavit in the case stating that she was able to feed Schiavo normally on multiple occasions - but that husband Michael Schiavo would allow only a feeding tube.

Heidi Law, a CNA at the Palm Gardens nursing home, testified:

"At least three times during any shift where I took care of Terri, I made sure to give Terri a wet washcloth filled with ice chips, to keep her mouth moistened. I personally saw her swallow the ice water and never saw her gag.
"[Another CNA] and I frequently put orange juice or apple juice in her washcloth to give her something nice to taste, which made her happy. On three or four occasions I personally fed Terri small mouthfuls of Jello, which she was able to swallow and enjoyed immensely."

Law testified that the only reason she didn't attempt to feed Ms. Schiavo more frequently was "because I was so afraid of being caught by Michael."

Editorializing on the case in light of Law's account, the Pittsburgh Post Gazette said Sunday, "It is one thing to withdraw a feeding tube; another entirely to withhold that day's meal tray."

Carla Sauer Iyer was a registered nurse at the same facility. In her own affidavit Iyer testified that Ms. Schiavo was capable of speech, explaining, "[Terri] spoke on a regular basis, saying such things as 'Mommy' and 'help me.'"

When she put a washcloth in Terri's hands to keep her fingers from curling together, Iyer said, "Michael saw it and made me take it out, saying that was therapy" that he had forbidden.

"Throughout my time at Palm Gardens, Michael Schiavo was focused on Terri's death," the RN noted. "Michael would say 'When is she going to die?' 'Has she died yet?' and 'When is that bitch gonna die?'"


Schiavo's Parents Appeal Judge's Ruling

Associated Press | March 22, 2005
By VICKIE CHACHERE

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) - A federal judge on Tuesday refused to order the reinsertion of Terri Schiavo's feeding tube, denying an emergency request from the brain-damaged woman's parents. The parents' lawyer quickly filed a notice of appeal.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge James Whittemore came after feverish action by President Bush and Congress on legislation allowing the contentious case to be reviewed by federal courts. The judge said the 41-year-old woman's parents had not established a ``substantial likelihood of success'' at trial on the merits of their arguments.

The notice of appeal was filed electronically hours later with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta by David Gibbs III, an attorney for Terri Schiavo's parents. The notice tells the court that the full appeal will follow. That court was already considering an appeal on whether Terri Schiavo's right to due process had been violated.

Whittemore wrote that Schiavo's ``life and liberty interests'' had been protected by Florida courts. Despite ``these difficult and time-strained circumstances,'' he wrote, ``this court is constrained to apply the law to the issues before it.''

While Rex Sparklin, another attorney for the parents, said the appeal was needed to ``save Terri's life,'' Howard Simon, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, praised the ruling.

``What this judge did is protect the freedom of people to make their own end-of-life decisions without the intrusion of politicians,'' Simon said.

Bobby Schindler, Terri Schiavo's brother, said his family was crushed. ``To have to see my parents go through this is absolutely barbaric,'' he told ABC's ``Good Morning America'' on Tuesday. ``I'd love for these judges to sit in a room and see this happening as well.''

Attempts to reach the woman's father, Bob Schindler, were unsuccessful early Tuesday. George Felos, the attorney for husband Michael Schiavo, hung up twice when reached by reporters from The Associated Press.

But Scott Schiavo, Michael Schiavo's brother, called the judge's decision ``a good thing,'' and said he did not believe Congress should have intervened.

``There's not a law that's made for this,'' Scott Schiavo said in a telephone interview. ``This is something that goes on 100 times a day in our country, that people, their wish to die with dignity is not a federal issue.''

The tube was disconnected Friday on the orders of a state judge, prompting an extraordinary weekend effort by congressional Republicans to push through unprecedented emergency legislation Monday aimed at keeping her alive.

Gov. Jeb Bush was described by a spokeswoman as ``extremely disappointed and saddened'' by the federal judge's decision not to order the tube reconnected. ``Gov. Bush will continue to do what he legally can within his powers to protect Terri Schiavo, a vulnerable person,'' said spokeswoman Alia Faraj.

Terri Schiavo did not have a living will. Her husband has fought in courts for years to have the tube removed because, he said, she would not want to be kept alive artificially and she has no hope for recovery. Her parents contend she responds to them and that her condition could improve.

Court-appointed doctors say she is in a persistent vegetative state with no hope of recovery. Doctors have said she could survive one to two weeks without the feeding tube.

Gibbs argued at a Monday hearing in front of Whittemore that letting Terri Schiavo starve would be ``a mortal sin'' under her Roman Catholic beliefs and urged quick action: ``Terri may die as I speak.''

But Felos argued that keeping the woman alive also violated her rights and noted that the case has been aired thoroughly in state courts.

``Yes, life is sacred,'' Felos said. ``So is liberty, particularly in this country.''

Michael Schiavo said he was outraged that lawmakers and the president intervened in a private matter. ``When Terri's wishes are carried out, it will be her wish. She will be at peace. She will be with the Lord,'' he said on CNN's ``Larry King Live'' late Monday.

Terri Schiavo suffered brain damage in 1990 when her heart stopped briefly. Her collapse was later linked to a potassium imbalance believed to have been brought on by an eating disorder. A successful malpractice lawsuit argued that doctors had failed to diagnose the eating disorder. She can breathe on her own, but has relied on the feeding tube to keep her alive.

According to a CNN-USA Today-Gallup poll of 909 adults taken over the weekend, nearly six in 10 people said they think the feeding tube should be removed and felt they would want to remove it for a child or spouse in the same condition.


Judge Won't Order Schiavo Tube Reinserted

Associated Press | March 22, 2005
By VICKIE CHACHERE

TAMPA, Fla. - A federal judge on Tuesday refused to order the reinsertion of Terri Schiavo's feeding tube, denying an emergency request from the brain-damaged woman's parents that had been debated in Congress and backed by the White House.

U.S. District Judge James Whittemore said the 41-year-old woman's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler, had not established a "substantial likelihood of success" at trial on the merits of their arguments.

Whittemore wrote that Schiavo's "life and liberty interests" had been protected by Florida courts. Despite "these difficult and time-strained circumstances," he wrote, "this court is constrained to apply the law to the issues before it."

Rex Sparklin, an attorney representing Terri Schiavo's parents, said lawyers were immediately appealing to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta to "save Terri's life." That court was already considering an appeal on whether Terri Schiavo's right to due process had been violated.

Howard Simon, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, praised the ruling: "What this judge did is protect the freedom of people to make their own end-of-life decisions without the intrusion of politicians."

Bobby Schindler, Terri Schiavo's brother, said his family was crushed. "To have to see my parents go through this is absolutely barbaric," he told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Tuesday. "I'd love for these judges to sit in a room and see this happening as well."

But Scott Schiavo, brother of Terri's husband, Michael, called the judge's decision "a good thing," and said he did not believe Congress should have intervened.

"There's not a law that's made for this," Scott Schiavo told The AP in a telephone interview. "This is something that goes on 100 times a day in our country, that people, their wish to die with dignity is not a federal issue."

Attempts to reach Bob Schindler were unsuccessful early Tuesday. George Felos, the attorney for Michael Schiavo, hung up twice when reached by reporters from The Associated Press.

Whittemore's decision comes after feverish action by President Bush and Congress on legislation allowing the brain-damaged woman's contentious case to be reviewed by federal courts.

The tube was disconnected Friday on the orders of a state judge, prompting an extraordinary weekend effort by congressional Republicans to push through unprecedented emergency legislation Monday aimed at keeping her alive.

Gov. Jeb Bush was described by a spokeswoman as "extremely disappointed and saddened" over the judge's decision not to order the tube reconnected. "Gov. Bush will continue to do what he legally can within his powers to protect Terri Schiavo, a vulnerable person," said the spokeswoman, Alia Faraj.

Terri Schiavo did not have a living will. Her husband has fought in courts for years to have the tube removed because he said she would not want to be kept alive artificially and she has no hope for recovery. Her parents contend she responds to them and her condition could improve.

David Gibbs III, the parents' attorney, argued at a Monday hearing in front of Whittemore that forcing Terri Schiavo to starve would be "a mortal sin" under her Roman Catholic beliefs and urged quick action: "Terri may die as I speak."

But George Felos, an attorney for Michael Schiavo, argued that keeping the woman alive also violated her rights and noted that the case has been aired thoroughly in state courts.

"Yes, life is sacred," Felos said, contending that restarting artificial feedings would be against Schiavo's wishes. "So is liberty, particularly in this country."

Michael Schiavo said he was outraged that lawmakers and the president intervened in a private matter. "When Terri's wishes are carried out, it will be her wish. She will be at peace. She will be with the Lord," he said on CNN's "Larry King Live" late Monday.

Terri Schiavo suffered brain damage in 1990 when her heart stopped briefly. Her collapse was later linked to a potassium imbalance believed to have been brought on by an eating disorder. A successful malpractice lawsuit argued that doctors had failed to diagnose the eating disorder. She can breathe on her own, but has relied on the feeding tube to keep her alive.

Court-appointed doctors say she is in a persistent vegetative state with no hope of recovery, while her parents insist she could recover with treatment. Doctors have said Schiavo could survive one to two weeks without the feeding tube.

According to a CNN-USA Today-Gallup poll of 909 adults taken over the weekend, nearly six in 10 people said they think the feeding tube should be removed and felt they would want to remove it for a child or spouse in the same condition.

On Tuesday, reaction to the judge's decision from the handful of protesters outside the woman's hospice came quickly. "It's terrible. They're going to talk and talk and she's going to die," said Miriam Zlotolow, 59, of Venice, Calif.


Both Sides in Fate of Brain-Damaged Woman Await Judge's Ruling After Political Maneuvering

The Associated Press | March 21, 2005
By VICKIE CHACHERE

The parents of Terri Schiavo asked a judge to reinsert the brain-damaged woman's feeding tube Monday, following an extraordinary political fight that consumed both chambers of Congress and prompted the president to rush back to the White House.

An attorney for Schiavo's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler, arrived at federal district court in Tampa and filed a request for an emergency injunction to keep their daughter fed.

When the attorney, David Gibbs II, was asked if he had any indication when the judge would rule on the request, he said: "I have no way to know, just that it's in the hands of the court."

It was assigned to U.S. District Judge James Whittemore, who was nominated to the court in 1999 by President Clinton. Gibbs said the judge sent a message that he would call the Schindlers' lawyers back to court once he completed a review of the filings in the case. Whittemore's staff was not available for comment early Monday morning.

Earlier Monday, the House, following a move by the Senate, passed a bill to let the parents ask a federal judge to prolong Schiavo's life by reinserting her feeding tube. President Bush signed the measure less than an hour later.

Schiavo's husband, Michael Schiavo, said he was outraged that lawmakers and the president were intervening in the contentious right-to-die battle. He has fought for years with his wife's parents over whether she should be permitted to die or kept alive through the feeding tube.

"This is a sad day for Terri. But I'll tell you what: It's also is a sad day for everyone in this country because the United States government is going to come in and trample all over your personal, family matters," he told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Monday.

Michael Schiavo has not responded to repeated interview requests from The Associated Press.

The lawsuit alleges a series of rights violations, including that Terri Schiavo's religious beliefs were being infringed upon, that the removal of the feeding tube violated her rights and that she was not provided an independent attorney to represent her interests.

Outside the hospice where his daughter entered her fourth day without food or water, Bob Schindler told reporters "I'm numb, I'm just totally numb. This whole thing, it's hard to believe it."

A shout of joy was heard from the crowd outside the hospice when news of the House bill's passage came. Among those cheering was David Bayly, 45, of Toledo, Ohio: "I'm overjoyed to see the vote and see Terri's life extended by whatever amount God gives her."

When dawn broke Monday, fewer than a dozen demonstrators remained at the hospice, but the area bustled with television lights, cameras and reporters covering the saga.

The 41-year-old woman's feeding tube was removed Friday on a Florida judge's order. Schiavo could linger for one or two weeks if the tube is not reinserted as has happened twice before, once on a judge's order and once after Gov. Jeb Bush signed "Terri's Law," which was later declared unconstitutional.

George Felos, a lawyer for Michael Schiavo, did not return repeated phone messages seeking comment Monday. The voicemail box of George Greer, the Florida circuit judge who presides over the case, was full and didn't accept messages.

Terri Schiavo suffered brain damage in 1990 when her heart stopped briefly because of a possible potassium imbalance brought on by an eating disorder. She can breathe on her own, but has relied on the feeding tube to keep her alive.

Court-appointed doctors say she is in a persistent vegetative state with no hope of recovery. Her husband says she would not want to be kept alive in that condition, but her parents insist she could recover with treatment.

Bob Schindler visited his daughter late Sunday and said he noticed the effects of dehydration on her. He said she appeared to be getting tired, but eventually responded to his teasing by making a face at him.

"It tells us she's still with us," he said.

Brian Schiavo, Michael's brother, said he spent Sunday afternoon with his brother and Terri at the hospice, but Terri did not move or make any noises. "Anybody that thinks that she talks and responds, they need to have a mental health examination," he said.

The bill passed in Congress applies only to Schiavo and would allow a federal court to review the case. The House passed the bill on a 203-58 vote after calling lawmakers back for an emergency Sunday session. The Senate approved the bill Sunday by voice vote. President Bush cut short a visit to his Texas ranch to return to the White House.

"In cases like this one, where there are serious questions and substantial doubts, our society, our laws and our courts should have a presumption in favor of life," President Bush said in a statement after signing the bill.

A crowd of about 50 people prayed and sang outside the hospice on Sunday. One man played "Amazing Grace" on a trumpet, as a pickup truck pulled a trailer bearing 10-foot-high replicas of the stone Ten Commandments tablets and a huge working version of the Liberty Bell.

Gov. Bush, praised the actions of Congress. "We in government have a duty to protect the weak, disabled and vulnerable," he said in a statement Monday. "I appreciate the efforts of state and federal lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who have taken this duty to heart."


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