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Illuminati Nazi death cult fascination dominant in mass killers and psychopaths. Teen Rampage Shooter Admired Hitler, Took Prozac

Infowars.com | March 23, 2005

Illuminati Nazi death cult fascination dominant in mass killers and psychopaths

Throughout history, serial killers and mass shooters have shown a persistent fixation with Nazi death cults. Charlie Manson had an obsession with nazis and death. Harris and Klebold of Columbine infamy said that they were going to carry out the killings "as a gift to Hitler."

The global elite clearly have the same taste. Skull and Bones springs from the same Germanic death cult that funded and energized Hitler. The elite Bohemian Grove is closely associated with both Germanic death cults in Germany and the Skull and Bones in the United States.

We are watching the developments as they unfold in the Weise shooting. There was clearly government involvement and prior knowledge in the Columbine shootings. Beauford Furrow, who shot up a Jewish school in California was part of a Nazi death cult and lived on a US military base in Washington State.

Larry Ashbrook, who rained bullets on a Fort Worth Baptist church youth meeting in the late '90s belonged to the same organization as Furrow and told the Fort Worth Star Telegram months before his rampage that he had been under government mind control since his time in the Navy. He begged the authorities to stop them.

Weise, like other shooters and psychopaths was on psychotropic drugs

It's no surprise to find out now that Jeff Weise, the 16-year-old who shot ten people in Minnesota, was being medicated with Prozac. Almost every mass killer in recent history has been on some sort of SSRI (serotonin re uptake inhibitor like Prozac, Paxil, Luvox and Zoloft).

While many proponents of drugs like Prozac cite that the reason these killers were on the drug in first place was to hopefully treat their depression, even the FDA has observed that Prozac enhances mental instability in many people, especially children, making them more suicidal and psychotically delusional.

Harris and Klebold, the Columbine shooters and Andrea Yates, the Texas woman who drowned her own five children, all were being medicated with a SSRI of some kind.


School Killer's Animated Terror


 

The Smoking Gun | March 24 2005

The Minnesota teenager responsible for Monday's high school shooting spree last year created a violent, blood-soaked video that included an animated character shooting four people and blowing up a police car before committing suicide, The Smoking Gun has learned. Using the alias "Regret," Jeff Weise, 16, last October posted online a 30-second animation entitled "Target Practice." Weise posted a second short, "Clown," several weeks after uploading "Target Practice" to a popular multimedia web site. The 50-second "Clown" ends with one character apparently being strangled by the clown. In a brief bio accompanying his Flash animations, Weise described himself as "nothin but a Native American teenage-stoner-industrialist," whose favorite movies included "Dawn of the Dead," "Thunderheart," and "Elephant," director Gus Van Sant's 2003 film about a Columbine-style school shooting (on his MSN profile page, Weise actually included an "Elephant" movie still showing two teenage characters--dressed in camouflage and carrying duffle bags containing weapons--heading for a school door).

The web page with links to Weise's two Flash animations includes his photo (seen above) and an e-mail address (decemberofthesoul@hotmail.com) that the teen used when posting 34 comments on the web site nazi.org, where Weise used the handles "nativenazi" and "todesengel," which translates to "angel of death" in German. According to police, Weise's killing rampage began with the murder of his grandfather and the man's female companion and ended at Red Lake High School, where he killed an unarmed security guard, a teacher, and five fellow students before apparently committing suicide. Seven others were wounded, including two teenage victims who remain in critical condition at a North Dakota hospital.

 

School shooter depicted as deeply disturbed, ignored teen

Washington Post | March 24, 2005
By Ceci Connolly and Dana Hedgpeth

Redlake, Minn. -- Two days after a shooting rampage on the Indian reservation here left 10 dead, friends, relatives and neighbors of Jeff Weise -- the 16-year- old assailant -- began to sketch a portrait of a deeply disturbed youth who had been treated for depression in a psychiatric ward, lost several close family members, sketched gruesome scenes of armed warriors and was removed from the school where he gunned down most of his victims Monday.

"The clues were all there," said Kim Desjarlait, Weise's step-aunt, who lives in Minneapolis. "Everything was laid out, right there, for the school or the authorities in Red Lake to see it coming. I don't want to blame Red Lake, but did they not put two and two together? This kid was crying out, and those guys chose to ignore it. They need to start focusing on their kids."

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Teen's Rampage Leaves 10 Dead in Minn

Teen killer reportedly admired Hitler

On the Red Lake Indian Reservation, officials held a private prayer service Wednesday night and met to discuss when students might be able to return to school. Superintendent Stuart Desjarlait said it may take months for the high school to reopen because of the extensive damage from Monday's rampage. Five students, a teacher and a guard were killed at the school. Seven students were wounded and two remained in critical condition Wednesday at a hospital in Fargo, N.D.

Federal authorities said they were conducting autopsies on Weise and his nine victims, but FBI spokesman Paul McCabe said he did not anticipate releasing any information in the near future. Tribal leaders were even less forthcoming, strictly limiting reporters' movements.

Tensions rose throughout Wednesday, with some residents whispering fears that if they spoke to outsiders they would suffer retribution. Residents of neighboring communities offered cautionary tales about violence on the reservation, and the Justice Department created a task force to deal with gangs when Red Lake suffered five homicides in seven months in 2002. Because Red Lake is a closed reservation, it operates as a sovereign nation, running its own police force and dictating who may set foot on the property.

Those willing to be interviewed described Weise as a young man who drifted among various homes on the reservation, listening to heavy metal music, proclaiming his affinity for Adolf Hitler and periodically showing up at the high school, even though Stuart Desjarlait said that six months ago he had ordered Weise to stay at home for tutoring.

He was taking the antidepressant Prozac and at least once was hospitalized for suicidal tendencies, said Gayle Downwind, a cultural coordinator at Red Lake Middle School, who taught Weise. It was not uncommon for Weise to spend at least one night a week at her home. "He considered my house a safe place to be," she said.

In his 16 years, Weise had lost many relatives. He was estranged from other family members and had a strained relationship with Daryl Lussier, the grandfather he killed at the start of Monday's rampage.

Family and friends said Weise's father, Daryl Lussier Jr., committed suicide in 1997. Two years later, a serious automobile accident killed a cousin and left Weise's mother partly paralyzed and brain damaged.

Then, about two years ago, "his other grandfather on his mom's side passed away," Kim Desjarlait told NBC's "Today" show. "You are dealing with three deaths within eight years. I think for a kid starting at 10 years old, that's a lot to take." At the time, she wanted to help raise Weise in Minneapolis, but he was sent to the reservation about 260 miles to the north.

In the sixth grade, Weise met Downwind's son, Sky Grant, and the two became close friends, often playing video games together. Grant recalled that Weise hated his mother and had a tendency to skip ahead to violent parts in movies they rented.

When Weise flunked eighth grade, he joined Downwind's special "Learning Center" program at the school. "He didn't function academically. He just sat there and drew pictures of army people with guns," she said. "He was a talented artist, but he drew terrible, terrible scenes."

Last June, Weise was suicidal. John Dudley, a part-time bus driver for the Red Lake health center, was called at the time to transport Weise to the hospital in Thief River Falls, about 60 miles from the reservation.

To some in the school, Weise was long a frightening figure, towering over many of the youngsters in all-black clothing. Because of recent bomb threats and other safety concerns, Red Lake High School insisted students secure a pass to go to the restroom, a requirement that agitated Weise, said Lee Ann Grant, Downwind's daughter, who had worked as a guard there since August.


 

Infowars.com | March 22, 2005

Despite the well documented fact that violent crime rates and firearm related violent crime rates in the US have been on the decline since 1994, the media still jumps on any opportunity to inflate the illusion of criminal threats and fuel the fears of an already paralyzed American public. The "school shooting rampage" has been touted by the media as the worst school shooting since Columbine which ignores the fact that the number of gun related homicides in schools has been in significant decline since 1998. Sensational stories of school shootings and gun crime are an easy sell to a violence-hungry American audience and by grossly exaggerating the threat of violence outside of urban centers, the media manages to magnify peoples' fear which sends them running scared to the government for protection in the form of strict gun control regulations and always brings them back for the next bloodbath horror story.

Teen's Rampage Leaves 10 Dead in Minn.

Associated Press | March 22, 2005
By JOSHUA FREED

REDBY, Minn. - The suspect in the worst U.S. school massacre since Columbine smiled and waved as he gunned down five students, a teacher and a guard, asking one of his victims whether he believed in God, witnesses said. The teen's grandfather and his grandfather's wife also were found dead, and the boy killed himself.

Reggie Graves, a student at Red Lake High School, said he was watching a movie about Shakespeare in class Monday when he heard the gunman blast his way past the metal detector at the school's entrance, killing a guard.

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Then, in a nearby classroom, he heard the gunman say something to his friend Ryan: "He asked Ryan if he believed in God," Graves said. "And then he shot him."

The death toll at the Red Lake Indian Reservation in far northern Minnesota made it the nation's worst school shooting since the rampage at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in April 1999 that left 12 students and a teacher, plus the two teen gunmen, dead.

The victims included the gunman's grandfather; the grandfather's wife; a school security guard; a teacher; and five other students. At least 14 others were wounded, officials said.

"There's not a soul that will go untouched by the tragic loss that we've experienced here," Floyd Jourdain Jr., chairman of the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe, told WCCO-TV of Minneapolis on Tuesday.

Police said the gunman killed himself after exchanging fire with officers. Red Lake Fire Director Roman Stately said the gunman had two handguns and a shotgun.

"We ask Minnesotans to help comfort the families and friends of the victims who are suffering unimaginable pain by extending prayers and expressions of support," Gov. Tim Pawlenty said.

The shooter was Jeff Weise, a 17-year-old student who had been placed in the school's Homebound program for some violation of policy, said school board member Kathryn Beaulieu. Students in that program stay at home and are tutored by a traveling teacher. Beaulieu said she didn't know what Weise's violation was, and wouldn't be allowed to reveal it if she did.

Beaulieu said school was canceled Tuesday, but plans hadn't been made for the rest of the week.

During the rampage, teachers herded students from one room to another, trying to move away from the sound of the shooting, said Graves, 14. He said some students crouched under desks.

Some pleaded with the gunman to stop. "You could hear a girl saying, 'No, Jeff, quit, quit. Leave me alone. What are you doing?'" Sondra Hegstrom told The Pioneer of Bemidji.

Student Ashley Morrison said she heard shots, then saw the gunman's face peering though a door window of a classroom where she was hiding with several other students. After banging at the door, the shooter walked away and she heard more shots, she said.

"I can't even count how many gunshots you heard, there was over 20. ... There were people screaming, and they made us get behind the desk," she said.

FBI spokesman Paul McCabe said the gunman exchanged gunfire with Red Lake police in a hallway, then retreated to a classroom, where he was believed to have shot himself.

All of the dead students were found in one room, including the teen believed to be the shooter.

Relatives told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Weise was a loner who usually wore black and was teased by other kids. Relatives told the newspaper his father committed suicide four years ago, and that his mother was living in a Minneapolis nursing home because she suffered brain injuries in a car accident.

Some of the injured were being cared for in Bemidji, about 20 miles south of Red Lake. Authorities closed roads to the reservation in far northern Minnesota while they investigated the shootings.

Police officers were posted at the hospital Monday night to keep reporters from entering. When a reporter approached three men walking across a hospital parking lot, one broke down in tears and the others said they had no comment.

It was the second fatal school shooting in Minnesota in 18 months. Two students were killed at Rocori High School in Cold Spring in September 2003. Student John Jason McLaughlin, who was 15 at the time, awaits trial in the case.

Red Lake High School has about 300 students, according to its Web site.

The reservation is about 240 miles north of the Twin Cities. It is home to the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe, one of the poorest in the state. According to the 2000 census, 5,162 people lived on the reservation, and all but 91 were Indians.


Teen who killed 9 reportedly admired Hitler

KeralaNext | March 22, 2005

[US News] BEMIDJI, Minn. - A troubling profile of the teenager who shot dead nine people, seven at his high school, emerged on Tuesday — one of a Native American who described himself as a "NativeNazi" and who other students said was regularly picked on for his odd behavior.

The teenager, identified as 17-year-old Jeff Weise, stormed into Red Lake High School on Monday afternoon, shooting dead a guard, a teacher and five students before apparently killing himself. At least 14 other students and teachers were wounded in the nation’s worst school shooting since the Columbine massacre in 1999 that killed 13 people.

Before the school shootings, Weise shot dead his grandfather and his grandfather's girlfriend at the home he shared with them.

Student Sondra Hegstrom, 17, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that Weise was into goth culture, wore "a big old black trench coat," drew pictures of skeletons, listened to heavy metal music and "talked about death all the time."

A couple of his friends had said he was suicidal, she added, and they said they were watching a movie once when he said, "That would be cool if I shot up the school."

"They didn't think anything of it," Hegstrom said, but "he got terrorized a lot" by others who called him names.

Relatives of Weise told the St. Paul Pioneer Press that Weise's father committed suicide four years ago, and his mother lives in a Minneapolis nursing home because she suffered brain injuries in a car accident, the relatives said.

Online postings about 'racial purity' Weise was also found by the St. Paul Pioneer Press newspaper to have posted several comments last year on an online forum frequented by neo-Nazis. He used the pen names Todesengel, German for "angel of death," and "NativeNazi."

"I guess I've always carried a natural admiration for Hitler and his ideals, and his courage to take on larger nations," Weise wrote in one session.

He shared the Nazi goal of racial purity, saying that when he talked in school about that for his own Chippewa tribe, "I get the same old argument which seems to be so common around here. 'We need to mix all the races, to combine all the strengths.'"

"They (teachers) don't openly say that racial purity is wrong," he added, "yet when you speak your mind on the subject you get 'silenced' real quick by the teachers and likeminded school officials."

"When I was growing up, I was taught (like others) that Nazi's were evil and that Hitler was a very evil man," he said in another posting. "Of course, not for a second did I believe this. ... They truly were doing it for the better."

He also wrote that he planned to recruit high school students to join a neo-Nazi movement he hoped to start on his reservation.

"The only ones who oppose my views are the teachers at the high school, and a large portion of the student body who think a Nazi is a Klansman, or a White Supremacist thug," he wrote. "Most of the Natives I know have been poisoned by what they were taught in school."

Students describe ordeal The school, which is on the Red Lake Chippewa Tribe reservation, has metal detectors but Weise reportedly shot an unarmed guard to get past the station.

Student Reggie Graves said he was watching a movie about Shakespeare in class Monday when he heard Weise blast his way past the metal detector.

Then, in a nearby classroom, he heard Weise say something to his friend Ryan: “He asked Ryan if he believed in God,” Graves said. “And then he shot him.”

During the rampage, teachers herded students from one room to another, trying to move away from the sound of the shooting, said Graves, 14. He said some students crouched under desks.

Student Ashley Morrison said she heard shots, then saw the gunman’s face peering though a door window of a classroom where she was hiding with other students.

With Weise banging on the door, she dialed her mother on her cell phone. “’Mom, he’s trying to get in here and I’m scared,”’ Morrison told her mother.

After banging, the shooter walked away and she heard more shots.

“I can’t even count how many gunshots you heard, there was over 20 ... there were people screaming, and they made us get behind the desk,” she said.

Hegstrom said her classmates pleaded with Weise to stop shooting.

“You could hear a girl saying, ’No, Jeff, quit, quit. Leave me alone. What are you doing?” she told The Pioneer of Bemidji.

Hegstrom described Weise grinning and waving at a student his gun was pointed at, then swiveling to shoot someone else. “I looked him in the eye and ran in the room, and that’s when I hid,” she said.

Grandfather's guns used? Red Lake Fire Director Roman Stately identified the shooter’s grandfather as Daryl Lussier, a longtime officer with the Red Lake Police Department, and said Lussier’s guns may have been used in the shootings.

Stately said Weise had two handguns and a shotgun. The teen reportedly drove up to the school in his grandfather's squad car.

“After he shot a security guard, he walked down the hallway shooting and went into a classroom where he shot a teacher and more students,” Stately told Minneapolis television station KARE.

Students and a teacher, Diane Schwanz, said the gunman tried to break down a door to get into her classroom. “I just got on the floor and called the cops,” Schwanz told the Pioneer. “I was still just half-believing it.”

All of the dead students were found in one room.


Minnesota School Shooter on Neo-Nazi Web Sites

Reuters | March 22, 2005

BEMIDJI, Minn. - A 17-year-old who killed nine people and himself on a Minnesota Indian reservation identified himself as an "angel of death" and a "NativeNazi" on Internet postings, a newspaper reported on Tuesday.

Officials sealed off the remote town of Red Lake, 60 miles south of the Canadian border, while they investigated Monday's bloodbath, the worst U.S. school shooting since the 1999 Columbine massacre.

Floyd Jourdain Jr., chairman of the Red Lake Indian council, called the tragedy "the darkest day in the history of our tribe."

The shooter was Red Lake High School sophomore Jeff Weise, according to witnesses and school officials.

Weise identified himself in Internet site postings as "Todesengel," German for "angel of death" and "NativeNazi," the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported.

He also claimed to have been questioned by police in 2004 about an alleged plot to shoot up the school on the anniversary of Adolf Hitler's birthday, but said he had nothing to do with that, the report said.

"I guess I've always carried a natural admiration for Hitler and his ideals, and his courage to take on larger nations," the newspaper quoted Weise as saying in one forum used by neo-Nazis.

Other reports described Weise as someone who was often teased at the school.

Weise's rampage began when he shot dead his grandfather, identified as veteran tribal police officer Daryl "Dash" Lussier, and Lussier's girlfriend at their home.

The gunman then drove his grandfather's police car to the school, where he killed a male security guard, a teacher and five students before taking his own, the FBI said.

"We believe the shooter was acting alone," said FBI agent Paul McCabe, adding the dead at the school were all in one room.

The gunman fired at doors of classrooms barricaded by terrified students and teachers, witnesses said.

"He came into the school and the first person he shot was the security officer at the door," said Molly Miron, editor of the Bemidji Pioneer newspaper. "One of the students told me he pointed his gun at a boy and then changed his mind, smiled, waved at him, and shot somebody else."

Police, alerted to the massacre when students used cell phones to call for help, said they exchanged gunfire with the gunman, who ducked into a classroom and shot himself.

Witnesses said he was armed with a shotgun or rifle and at least one handgun.

It was the deadliest U.S. school shooting since the April 20, 1999, Columbine High School massacre in Colorado in which 14 students -- including the two killers -- and a teacher died.

The Minnesota reservation is controlled by the Ojibwa tribe, commonly known as the Chippewa, which says it has roughly 10,000 members, about half of whom live on the reservation.

The tribe runs its own affairs and operates casinos in the state and a small casino in Red Lake, 35 miles north of Bemidji on the shores of Lower Red Lake. But the casinos are not as successful as others in more populous areas and unemployment on the reservation is high.

It was the latest multiple shooting in a month of deadly gun violence in the United States, including the deaths of seven congregants at a church service near Milwaukee and four people in an Atlanta courtroom escape.


 

Gunman kills 2 at home, kills 6 at school

The Bosh | March 21, 2005

A gunman opened fire Monday at the Red Lake High School, on the Red Lake Indian Reservation in far northern Minnesota, about 240 miles north of the Twin Cities. Six people died in the mid-afternoon shooting at the High School, including four students, the suspect believed among those dead, left 14 injured, two critical. Also killed were a teacher and a security guard, FBI spokesman Paul McCabe said at a news conference in Minneapolis. Earlier in the day a man and a woman were shot in their home and died later. McCabe declined to talk about a possible connection between the suspect and the couple killed at the home, but Red Lake Fire Director Roman Statley said they were the grandparents of the shooter. Stateley said the grandfather was a police officer whose guns may have been used in the shootings reports signonsandiego.com. All of the dead students were found in one room. One of them was a boy believed to be the shooter, McCabe said. He would not comment on reports that the boy shot himself and said it was too early to speculate on a motive. The school was evacuated after the shootings and locked down for investigation, McCabe said.

"It will probably take us throughout the night to really put the whole picture together," McCabe said.

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