British Prime Minister David Cameron has reacted to the Greek election and the rejection of globalist austerity measures by saying the victory of Syriza in the Greek general election over the weekend will “increase economic uncertainty across Europe.”

On Sunday the leader of radical leftist Syriza party, Alexis Tsipras, promised to end five years of austerity, “humiliation and suffering” imposed by international banksters on the Greek people.

Tsipras is a dedicated communist who gave his youngest son the middle name of Ernesto after Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara.

“Greece leaves behinds catastrophic austerity, it leaves behind fear and authoritarianism, it leaves behind five years of humiliation and anguish,” Tsipras, who was sworn in as prime minister on Monday, told supporters.

The Greek coalition party now has an absolute, 151-seat majority in parliament.

Tsipras and Syriza demand a renegotiation of Greece’s £179 billion bailout and a revisitation of the clauses that make the Greek government’s implementation of devastating austerity measures mandatory.

Additionally, Syriza is calling for cancellation of over 50 percent of Greek debt owed to ECB banksters and Eurozone states.

The victory of Syriza has emboldened the anti-austerity movement in Britain and on the European continent.

In Britain, Labor Party members called the Syriza win “exciting” and demanded Ed Millibrand, the leader of the party, oppose “savage” spending cuts by the British government.

“Nobody should underestimate the anger and the demand for change here,” said leftwing Labor MP John McDonnell. He said the Syriza victory points the way for similar moves in Britain.

The British chancellor, George Osborne, warned the promises made by Syriza to end crippling austerity would be “very difficult to deliver and incompatible with what the eurozone currently demands of its members.”

In December, Osborne detailed an austerity plan for Britain that reduces public spending to levels not seen since the 1930s and the Great Depression. The plan calls for the loss of a million public sector jobs, reduction of public sector wages, an increase in rates levied on property, and an aggressive crackdown on tax avoidance.

Despite the stance of politicos, banksters and EU apparatchiks in Britain and Europe, the Syriza win does not bode well for European central banker schemes.

“Europe is well-aware that any Greek renegotiation means one thing: an impairment of the ECB balance sheet, something which is also a non-starter for the central bank which is already toying dangerously close with losing all credibility as well as big losses for German taxpayers now that the bulk of Greek debt exposure has been mutualized outside of the banking sector,” notes Zero Hedge.

“Whatever happens, expect a substantial increase in volatility in coming weeks as Greek pre-election promises and the harsh European reality finally collide, and lots and lots of red flashing headlines and FX kneejerk responses.”


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