Buffalo, N.Y., police will begin confiscating firearms of deceased gun owners from their next-of-kin.

Buffalo Police Commissioner Daniel Derrenda said the department will be sending cops to collect guns from the families of pistol permit holders who had died.

“We recently started a program where we’re cross referencing all the pistol permit holders with the death records, and we’re sending people out to collect the guns whenever possible so that they don’t end up in the wrong hands,” said Police Commissioner Daniel Derrenda. “Because at times they lay out there and the family is not aware of them and they end up just out on the street.”

His rhetoric is little more than an excuse to eradicate the Second Amendment.

“They’re quick to say they’re going to take the guns,” the president of the New York State Rifle & Pistol Association, Tom King, said to Fox News. “But they don’t tell you the law doesn’t apply to long guns, or that these families can sell [their loved one’s] pistol or apply to keep it.”

And it’s likely the cops will take every gun they can find, according to Bob Owens of BearingArms.com.

“They’re going to use the relative’s pistol permit as the proverbial camel’s nose under the tent to get at every firearm they can, hoping to remove all the firearms from the home while the family is at their most vulnerable,” he wrote.

The fact that the cops are using a pistol permit registry to determine what guns to confiscate is further proof that gun registrations lead to confiscations.

Last year the New York Police Department began sending out notices to registered gun owners demanding that they give up their firearms in the wake of the state’s newest gun control law, the SAFE Act.

The notice told gun owners, who possessed firearms now prohibited under the SAFE Act, the “options” to either surrender their firearms to the police, remove them from the city limits or otherwise render them inoperable.

Like the Buffalo Police Department, the NYPD knew exactly who to send the notices to by using a centralized firearms registry which lists the city’s gun owners and what firearms they had in their possession.

And the police departments can make a lot of money off of selling confiscated guns.

“These gun collections can value into the hundreds of thousands,” Buffalo defense attorney Dominic Saraceno said. “If a police officer came to my door without a warrant signed by a judge, I’m not giving them anything.”

“Most people don’t know that and get intimidated.”


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