Concerned citizens from environmental and food safety groups gave formal notice of intent to sue to the Environmental Protection Agency for approving a toxic new pesticide called bicyclopyrone (BCP).

The EPA is accused of not considering the fatal consequences to befall endangered animals and plants, especially butterflies and bees responsible for pollinating our food, should BCP be used.

The EPA approved BCP in a new super-toxic pesticide formula to be marketed as Acuron in April of this year, and it is expected to kill or injure a large number of plants and animals.

The agency’s own risk assessment found that BCP alone exceeds levels of concern for mammals and hundreds of plants protected under the Endangered Species Act. Acuron also contains three other ingredients, Atrazine, Mesotrione, and S-Metolachlor, concocted by Syngenta. All of them are lethally toxic as well.

This single new herbicidal concoction has the ability to wipe out half of all endangered species in the US. Sadly, the EPA gave its makers permission for use on corn – one of the biggest GM crops grown across our country – despite the fact that no tests on the herbicide’s impact on wildlife have been conducted.

The EPA also refused to look at the synergistic effect of using all four ingredients together and only looked at BCA as an isolated substance.

George Kimbrell, a senior attorney at the Center for Food Safety, says:

 “The EPA’s action was unlawful and irresponsible because it failed to include measures to protect endangered species, water quality and the environment. Further, EPA failed to consider the synergistic effects of the four products in Acuron or the effects of Acuron when used with GE Roundup Ready corn and other pesticides in the field. EPA needs to stop haphazardly approving these dangerous new pesticide cocktails.”

This lawsuit was launched in the midst of “national pollinator week.” It followed the White House Pollinator Task Force report which included a finding showing that habitat loss, along with glyphosate use, is a leading reason for the decimation of our pollinating insects. It also follows the previous announcements from home improvement stores like Lowe’s, detailing how they will stop selling bee-killing neonicotinoids.

The EPA admits that BCP may cause acute and chronic damage to bees, stating in its ecological risk assessment that, “[s]ince bicyclopyrone is a systemic herbicide, residues may be transported to pollen and/or nectar and represent a route of exposure for bees through both contact and ingestion.”

Yet, the EPA approved Acuron.

This article originally appeared at Natural Society.


NEWSLETTER SIGN UP

Get the latest breaking news & specials from Alex Jones and the Infowars Crew.

Related Articles


Comments