Geoff Gaherty
huffingtonpost.com
April 24, 2014

The sun will look like a ring of fire above some remote parts of the world next Tuesday (April 29) during a solar eclipse, but most people around the world won’t get a chance to see it.

Whereas lunar eclipses occur only when there’s a full moon, and solar eclipses only happen during a new moon. Half the world saw a lunar eclipse during the full moon on April 15. When a lunar eclipse occurs, it usually means there is also a solar eclipse at the preceding or following new moon.

Tuesday’s solar eclipse is known as an “annular” — rather than “total” — lunar eclipse. That’s because Tuesday’s eclipse will occur when the moon is close to its farthest distance from the Earth, making it too small to cover the sun completely. The resulting effect looks like a ring of fire, called an “annulus,” appears around the silhouette of the moon.

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