Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
November 1, 2013

Robert Tosh Plumlee, a pilot who flew clandestine CIA flights, told Infowars today that Fox News, who interviewed him last September, is attempting to shift blame for the 1980s Contra resupply network to the CIA.

Former CIA pilot Tosh Plumlee. Photo: Crónica en Zona Libre
Former CIA pilot Tosh Plumlee. Photo: Crónica en Zona Libre

The network was the work of the Reagan administration, then Marine Col. Oliver North, and the NCS, Plumlee contends. The covert operation was in direct violation of the Boland Amendment, a legislative effort to prevent the United States government from funding and assisting the Contras, the mercenary group attempting to overthrow the Sandinista regime in Nicaragua in the early 1980s.

Fox News ran a story on roles played by the CIA and the Reagan administration in the Contra Affair after the release of Rafael Caro Quintero from prison this past August.

Quintero, a former Mexican drug lord responsible for founding the Guadalajara Cartel, was convicted of murdering DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena Salazar and others, including a journalist, in 1985.

Information received primarily from US authorities, the DEA, the White House, and the National Security council and forwarded to Mexican authorities played in a role in Camarena’s murder, Plumlee told Infowars in an effort to set the record straight.

Plumlee insists the CIA did not murder Camarena as a number of news outlets have reported.

Following an interview with Fox News, the network ran a story implying that the CIA was involved and played a part in the torture murder of Camarena and Plumlee was the CIA pilot who helped Quintero escape to Guatemala and then to Costa Rica.

“That was not the case,” Plumlee told Infowars.

Plumlee told author Rodney Stitch (Drugging America: A Trojan Horse) in 2005 that the CIA, the DEA, the FBI and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee were aware American government agencies were involved in shipping drugs into the United States from Central America to fund the Contra freedom fighters. Details on these illicit drug running operations were also exposed in the 1990s by San Jose Mercury News journalist Gary Webb, who later died under suspicious circumstances.

In 1983, prior to government hearings on what would become known as the Iran-Contra Affair, Plumlee met on several occasions with Senator Gary Hart and his security aide, Bill Holden. He provided Hart with detailed maps, information on battle zones and air routes, and additional information concerning the training of Guatemalan guerillas at drug kingpin Rafael Caro Quintero’s ranch, aircraft ID numbers, and other information.

The information was subsequently passed along to Massachusetts Democrat John Kerry, who was then chairman on the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Communications. Nothing came of this attempt to shed light on the government’s drug-running operations or the death of DEA agent Camarena.

“Why did they bust the Buffalo marijuana ranch, but let the gun-running to the Contra go unimpeded?” Camarena had asked before his abduction and murder in Mexico.

Plumlee asked the same question to government officials during a debriefing in Phoenix, Arizona before Camarena was abducted and murdered. Plumlee confirmed that this conversation took place with government officials during a telephone interview with Infowars.

Plumlee’s allegations about Reagan administration complicity in gunrunning staged alongside an illegal drug operation were ultimately dropped from an interview conducted by Fox News, the corporate media bastion for Republican conservatives who idolize Ronald Reagan.

In September, Mr. Plumlee appeared on the Alex Jones Show to talk about the murder of Ambassador Stevens in Benghazi and the State Department’s gunrunning and arms shipment operation to support al-Qaeda fighting in Syria to overthrow the regime of Bashar al-Assad.

Tosh Plumlee DEA files


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