Media War: The Battle for Crimea


Tony Cartalucci
Land Destroyer
March 18, 2014

The Western press has been deceiving readers, listeners, and viewers since the beginning of the so-called “Euromaidan” protests - from covering up the ultra-right wing ideology and literal Neo-Nazi flag wavers leading the mobs, to the role the West has played in organizing, funding, and equipping the protesters in the first place.

Image: Crimea Vote (YouTube).

With their proxies now entrenched in Kiev after violently overthrowing the elected government of  Viktor Yanukovych, the truth has begun to trickle out, and with it, Russia has gained ground against the West in its defense of the Ukrainian people from what is essentially and quite obviously a right-wing Nazi regime backed by foreign interests from the West once again occupying Ukrainian territory just as they had in World War II.

And just like in World War II, the Crimea peninsula has become a pivotal battleground.

While there are Russia troops, permanently stationed in Crimea under a long-standing treaty, and the West has begun to posture militarily – the battle is currently being fought across the media.

Laying Out the Battleground in Crimea: Russia’s Case 

Russia has defended Ukraine from fascism for decades, spending the blood of millions pushing the Nazis out of the region in the 1940′s and now again against literal Neo-Nazis occupying Kiev after yet another Western-backed coup has overthrown Ukraine’s elected government – the first being the US-engineered 2004 “Orange Revolution” (as covered in the Guardian’s article, “US campaign behind the turmoil in Kiev“).

Russia insists that once again, fascism threatens the lives and freedoms of the Ukrainian people with whom Russia shares a collective history, long-standing socioeconomic and even linguistic and cultural ties. This is based not on “Russian propaganda,” but on demonstrated actions already carried out by the new Western-backed regime in Kiev.

Immediately after seizing power, the assault on Russian-Ukrainians began. The International Business Times in its article, “Watch Your Tongue: Language Controversy One Of Fundamental Conflicts In Ukraine,” pointed out that:

Immediately after the removal of President Viktor Yanukovych from power on Feb. 22, the Ukrainian Parliament repealed a controversial law passed in 2012 that allowed the use of “regional languages” – including Russian, Hungarian, Romanian and Tatar — in courts and certain government functions in areas of the country where such speakers constituted at least 10 percent of the population. (In 1991, in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the newly independent state of Ukraine established Ukrainian as its sole official language.)

The West’s Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) would also find it necessary to condemn moves by the regime in Kiev to censor Russian media in Ukraine. A post appearing on OSCE’s official website titled, “OSCE media freedom representative concerned about new steps to restrict media plurality in Ukraine,” stated:

OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media Dunja Mijatović today expressed concern about demands that cable operators in Ukraine stop transmitting certain Russian television channels.

“I repeat my call to the authorities not to initiate these repressive measures,” Mijatović said. “Banning programming without a legal basis is a form of censorship; national security concerns should not be used at the expense of media freedom.”

On 11 March the National Television and Radio Broadcasting Council of Ukraine demanded that all cable operators stop broadcasts of the Russian television channels Rossiya 24, ORT, RTR Planeta and NTV-Mir.

It is clear that the West’s newly created regime in Kiev is pursing a dangerous and oppressive policy that amounts to fascism. With parties such as “Right Sector,” Svoboda, and the “Fatherland Party” forming its leadership and openly espousing hatred toward Jews, Russians, homosexuals and other minorities, it is no surprise that Ukraine’s predominantly Russia regions in the east seek to disassociate and remove themselves from the current regime in Kiev. Nor is it a surprise that Russia is mobilizing resources to defend against a historically familiar threat that once again lies directly along their border.

The West’s Front in Crimea 

Read the rest at New Eastern Outlook… 


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