A counter terror advisor to the British government has told the tabloid the Daily Mirror Islamic State terrorists plan to use drones in attacks on music festivals and football games.

“There is a genuine threat from Islamists wishing to deliver high explosives by drone to crowded areas. The effects could be devastating,” said Colonel Richard Kemp, who was the Commander of British Forces in Afghanistan in 2003.

The Mirror cites defense and senior MI6 sources who say ISIS is experimenting with toy drones and are attempting to buy commercial drones like the ones used by the military.

“They want the spectacular devastation of such a raid, which would cause murder and maiming in a crowd, while filming it for a sick video.

“ISIS is obsessed with re-creating the horror of 9/11 and believes this may be possible by launching a multi-drone attack on large numbers of people in a synchronized attack.”

Earlier this year U.S.-led coalition forces in Iraq claimed to have destroyed an ISIS drone near Fallujah.

“They don’t have reusable attack drones, but I think it is just a matter of time before they jury-rig surveillance drones into flying IEDs. Basically, they could turn them into little kamikaze drones,” said Christopher Harmer, a senior naval analyst with the Middle East Security Project at the Institute for the Study of War, a Washington D.C.-based think tank.

The think tank was founded by the neocon Kimberly Kagan and is supported by large defense contractors, including Raytheon, General Dynamics, DynCorp and others.

US-led coalition said it shot down an ISIS drone in March.

Drone Propaganda and the Iraq Invasion

The warning is similar to one issued in the lead-up to the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

In February of that year Secretary of State Colin Powell showed a picture of a small drone plane during his presentation to the U.N. Security Council.

“UAVs outfitted with spray tanks constitute an ideal method for launching a terrorist attack using biological weapons,” Powell said during his speech. “Iraq could use these small UAVs, which have a wingspan of only a few meters, to deliver biological agents to its neighbors or, if transported, to other countries, including the United States.”

President Bush also mentioned Iraqi UAVs or drones in a speech prior to the invasion.

In September, 2004 a United Nations commission monitoring Iraq’s weapons programs said it found no evidence Saddam Hussein violated Security Council restrictions on the development of military drones.

“The information available to us doesn’t indicate Iraq had these drones for the delivery of chemical or biological weapons agents, nor had they gone beyond the 150 kilometer range, but we’re open to new information and looking forward to the Iraq Survey Group’s findings,” said Dmitris Perricos, the acting director of the commission.


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