Moody’s: “Probability Of Multiple Defaults By Euro Area Countries No Longer Negligible”

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Tyler Durden
Zero Hedge
November 28, 2011

If all it takes for the ES to soar by over 30 points is some propaganda about US consumer spending (pretty much ridiculed by all at this point), and two outright lies about Europe being fixed, the following factual statement by Moody’s should certainly send risk soaring now that bizarro mode is fully on: “over the past few weeks, the likelihood of even more negative scenarios has risen. This reflects, among other factors, the political uncertainties in Greece and Italy, uncertainty around the final haircut imposed on holders of Greek debt, the emphasis in the recent Euro Summit statement on the conditional nature of the existing support programmes and the further worsening of the economic outlook across the euro area. Alternative outcomes fall into two broad categories: those involving one or more defaults by euro area countries (in addition to Greece’s PSI programme); and those additionally involving exits from the euro area. The probability of multiple defaults (in addition to Greece’s private sector involvement programme) by euro area countries is no longer negligible. In Moody’s view, the longer the liquidity crisis continues, the more rapidly the probability of defaults will continue to rise.” Oddly enough, for once Moody’s is not alone. The conclusion: “in the absence of major policy initiatives in the near future which stabilise credit market conditions, or those conditions stabilising for any other reason, the point is likely to be reached where the overall architecture of Moody’s ratings within the euro area, and possibly elsewhere within the EU, will need to be revisited.”

Full note:

Moody’s: Rising Severity of Euro Area Sovereign Crisis Threatens EU Sovereign Ratings

The continued rapid escalation of the euro area sovereign and banking credit crisis is threatening the credit standing of all European sovereigns, cautions Moody’s Investors Service in a new Special Comment. In the absence of policy measures that stabilise market conditions over the short term, or those conditions stabilising for any other reason, credit risk will continue to rise. Moody’s new report notes that, amid the increasing pressure on euro area authorities to act quickly to restore credit market confidence, the constraints they face are also rising. While the euro area as a whole possesses tremendous economic and financial strength, institutional weaknesses continue to hinder the resolution of the crisis and weigh on ratings. In terms of the policy framework, the euro area is approaching a junction, leading either to closer integration or greater fragmentation.

While Moody’s central scenario remains that the euro area will be preserved without further widespread defaults, even this ‘positive’ scenario carries very negative rating implications in the interim period. The rating agency notes that the political impetus to implement an effective resolution plan may only emerge after a series of shocks, which may lead to more countries losing access to market funding for a sustained period and requiring a support programme. This would very likely cause those countries’ ratings to be moved into speculative grade in view of the solvency tests that would likely be required and the burden-sharing that might be imposed if (as is likely) support were to be needed for a sustained period.

However, over the past few weeks, the likelihood of even more negative scenarios has risen. This reflects, among other factors, the political uncertainties in Greece and Italy, uncertainty around the final haircut imposed on holders of Greek debt, the emphasis in the recent Euro Summit statement on the conditional nature of the existing support programmes and the further worsening of the economic outlook across the euro area. Alternative outcomes fall into two broad categories: those involving one or more defaults by euro area countries (in addition to Greece’s PSI programme); and those additionally involving exits from the euro area.

  • The probability of multiple defaults (in addition to Greece’s private sector involvement programme) by euro area countries is no longer negligible. In Moody’s view, the longer the liquidity crisis continues, the more rapidly the probability of defaults will continue to rise.
  • A series of defaults would also significantly increase the likelihood of one or more members not simply defaulting, but also leaving the euro area. Moody’s believes that any multiple-exit scenario — in other words, a fragmentation of the euro — would have negative repercussions for the credit standing of all euro area and EU sovereigns.

Moody’s notes that the situation is fluid and fast-moving. Policymakers are likely to respond to the escalating risks with new measures, the credit implications of which will require careful consideration. In the meantime, new shocks to financing conditions — whether the announcement of new programmes or simply a further acceleration in the rise of funding cost across the euro area — are likely to lead to selective rating changes. More broadly, in the absence of major policy initiatives in the near future which stabilise credit market conditions, or those conditions stabilising for any other reason, the point is likely to be reached where the overall architecture of Moody’s ratings within the euro area, and possibly elsewhere within the EU, will need to be revisited. Moody’s expects to complete such a repositioning during the first quarter of 2012.

This article was posted: Monday, November 28, 2011 at 8:53 am







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