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Terror Tactics and Lies to Force Toxic Vaccines on Texas Schoolchildren Despite Available Exemption

Infowars.com
August 24, 2004

The Austin-American Statesman is reporting today (and helping push the agenda) that Austin School District Officials " are warning parents that children without all required immunizations will not be able to enroll next year."

This is an outright lie. Parents Requesting Open Vaccine Education (PROVE) states: "Thanks to HB 2292 passed in the Texas Legislature and signed by the governor, starting September 1, 2003, Texas will become the 19th state to have a conscientious exemption. HB 2292 also corrected the unconstitutional aspect of the religious exemption. Now the exemption can be for "a religious belief", and the unconstitutional requirement to be an adherent of a recognized religion which opposes immunization has been stricken from law. Additionally, the criteria allowing a physician to write a medical exemption has broadened to allow doctors more flexibility to write exemptions."

The fact is, parents have a right to refuse vaccination. Vaccines have been related to Autism and many, many toxins have been found in vaccines (click here for an archive of articles). It's the parents' choice and the Austin School District is doing everything in its power to intimidate Austinites into subjecting their children to vaccination with these toxins.

In Austin, it's no shots, no school

District launches campaign now to be sure parents know that all students must be immunized before school year begins in fall

By Melissa Ludwig

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF/Friday, May 21, 2004

Though the school year is not quite over, Austin school district officials are warning parents that children without all required immunizations will not be able to enroll next year.

Tracy Diggs, coordinator of student health services, said 18,000 students showed up on the first day of school last year without their shots, a number the district whittled down to 7,000 by sending letters to parents and holding free shot clinics.

This year, parents of an estimated 19,000 students with incomplete immunization records must get those shots before school starts, Diggs said. She said the district will send a letter in Spanish and English to every parent whose child needs a shot, with a list of times and locations for shot clinics over the summer, most of them free.

"We are trying to make it as easy as possible on parents so they can get it done early. We want them to be back-to-school shopping in August, not standing in line waiting to get an immunization," Diggs said.

In March, Attorney General Greg Abbott issued an opinion saying schools should adhere to a Texas Department of Health policy blocking enrollment for children who have not had all their shots. In previous years, the district followed a Texas Education Agency policy that allowed 30 days from the start of school to get immunized, Diggs said.

In the past, Diggs said, students have not shown up when schools organized free shot clinics, but the district is hoping to raise awareness by sending parents clinic information, doing public service announcements and making the process as "user-friendly" as possible.

For parents who don't want their children immunized, a state law that went into effect last September allows parents to apply for a waiver from the Texas Department of Health. Parents who can produce a notarized waiver do not have to get their children immunized before enrolling them, Diggs said.

Department spokesman Doug McBride said about 4,400 children across the state have received waivers, a small fraction of the state's 4.3 million children in public schools this year.

"We are strong believers in the value of vaccinations as a way to prevent illness and disease, but the objection for reasons of conscience is a legal option parents have," he said.

mludwig@statesman.com ; 445-3620

Texas Vaccine Exemption Information for the 2003 School Year (8/14/03)

PROVE/2003 (this still applies today)

Dear PROVE Texas Members -

Thanks to HB 2292 passed in the Texas Legislature and signed by the governor, starting September 1, 2003, Texas will become the 19th state to have a conscientious exemption. HB 2292 also corrected the unconstitutional aspect of the religious exemption. Now the exemption can be for "a religious belief", and the unconstitutional requirement to be an adherent of a recognized religion which opposes immunization has been stricken from law. Additionally, the criteria allowing a physician to write a medical exemption has broadened to allow doctors more flexibility to write exemptions.

IN ORDER TO UTILIZE THE CONSCIENTIOUS OR RELIGIOUS EXEMPTIONS IN TEXAS ON OR AFTER SEPTEMBER 1, 2003 FOR  ADMISSION TO PUBLIC OR PRIVATE SCHOOL, DAY CARE, OR INSTITUTES OF HIGHER EDUCATION, THE LAW REQUIRES THE PARENT TO:

1) Obtain an official original exemption form from the Texas Department of Health for each child (photocopies will not be accepted by the school or day care)

     Requests must be in writing and can be made IMMEDIATELY
          In writing By Mail or in Person Only :
               The Texas Department of Health
               Immunization Division
               1100 West 49th Street
               Austin, TX 78756
      (to be able to prove to your school that you made a request if TDH messes up, you may want to consider sending your request by certified mail with a return receipt)

     Include in your request:

  • that you are requesting immunization exemption forms (include how many you want up to 5)
  • the full names and birthdates of the children for which you are requesting immunization exemption forms

  • your signature, your name, and the complete postal mail address where you want the forms mailed

FYI: TDH is prohibited by law from keeping a record of who asks for a form. They are only required to track the total number of forms mailed out.

2) Fill out the form and have it notarized. The department will send you 5 copies of the exemption form per child with your child's name and birthday preprinted on it, but you only need one for admission - save the rest in case you move or need it for something else. Don't sign the form until you are in front of the notary so they can witness and stamp it. (Notaries can usually be found at your bank, commercial postal outlet centers, and some are listed in the phone book. Banks typically don't charge for this service while the notaries at commercial postal centers and those listed in the phone book do charge.)

3) Submit one original signed and notarized form to your school or day care, and only forms notarized within 90 days of being submitted will be accepted, so don't rush to have your form notarized until you are ready to submit it. Do NOT send the completed form to the health department. You may want to make a photocopy of the signed original form for your own records and have the person you submitted the original form to sign and date the photocopy in acknowledgement that they have received and accepted the original. This way you have something to show the school or day care to prove you submitted it if they should misplace your paperwork and to encourage them to look for it a little better.

IN ORDER TO UTILIZE A MEDICAL EXEMPTION ON OR AFTER SEPTEMBER 1, 2003:

Any doctor (MD or DO - no chiropractors) licensed to practice medicine in the United States who has examined your child may write and sign a letter stating that "in the physician's opinion, the immunization required poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the applicant or any member of the applicant's family or household." Doctors no longer have to state that the immunization "would be injurious" to the child.

FOR FAMILIES ENROLLING CHILDREN IN SCHOOL OR DAY CARE BEFORE SEPTEMBER 1, 2003:
The law in place before September 1, 2003 provides for both a religious and medical exemption. Information on utilizing a religious exemption including a sample letter can be found on our web site at: http://www.vaccineinfo.net/exemptions/relexemptlet.shtml

If you've previously submitted a religious exemption letter prior to 9/1/03 you do not need to submit a new one - it is grandfathered.

If you've previously submitted a medical exemption and it is for a lifelong condition, you are not required to submit anything new.
For updates on this information, please stay subscribed to our email list at
http://vaccineinfo.net/subscribe.htm   and watch our web site.

Some schools are enrolling children where the parents are telling the school officials that they will submit the form as soon as they get it from the Health Department. Other schools are enforcing the old law in effect until September 1, 2003 . Check with your school district directly how they will handle this. If your district is insistent that they will not admit your child unless they are fully vaccinated and you desire an exemption, you have the right of a religious and medical exemption as explained above under the old law.


THE LAW NOW READS TO SAY:

Section 38.001, Education Code:
(c) Immunization is not required for a person's admission to any elementary or secondary school if the person applying for admission:
     (1) submits to the admitting official:
          A) an affidavit or a certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine in the United States, in which it is stated that, in the physician's opinion, the immunization required poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the applicant or any member of the applicant's family or household; or
          (B) an affidavit signed by the applicant or, if a minor, by the applicant's parent or guardian stating that the applicant declines immunization for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief or
     (2) is a member of the armed forces of the United States and is on active duty.
(c-1) An affidavit submitted under Section (c)(1)(B) must be on a form described by Section 161.0041, Health and Safety Code, and must be submitted to the admitting official not later than the 90th day after the date the affidavit is notarized.
(f) A person who has not received the immunizations required by this section for reasons of conscience, including because of the person's religious beliefs, may be excluded from school in times of emergency or epidemic declared by the commissioner of public health.

Section 51.933, Education Code:
(d) No form of immunization is required for a person's admission to an institution of higher education if the person applying for admission:
      (1) submits to the admitting official:
           (A) an affidavit or a certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine within the United States in which it is stated that, in the physician's opinion, the immunization required poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the applicant or any member of the applicant's family or household; or
          (B) an affidavit signed by the applicant or, if a minor, by the applicant's parent or guardian stating that the applicant declines immunization for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief; or
     (2) is a member of the armed forces of the United States and is on active duty.
(d-1) An affidavit submitted under Section (d)(1)(B) must be on a form described by Section 161.0041, Health and Safety Code, and must be submitted to the admitting official not later than the 90th day after the date the affidavit is notarized.

Section 161.004(d), Health and Safety Code:
(d) A child is exempt from an immunization required by this section if:
     (1) a parent, managing conservator, or guardian states that the immunization is being declined for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief; or
     (2) the immunization is medically contraindicated based on the opinion of a physician licensed by any state in the United States who has examined the child.

Subchapter A, Chapter 161, Health and Safety Code:
Sec. 161.0041. IMMUNIZATION EXEMPTION AFFIDAVIT FORM.
(a) A person claiming an exemption from a required immunization based on reasons of conscience, including a religious belief, under Section 161.004 of this code, Section 38.001 or 51.933, Education
Code, or Section 42.043, Human Resources Code, must complete an affidavit on a form provided by the department stating the reason for the exemption.
(b) The affidavit must be signed by the person claiming the exemption or, if the person is a minor, the person's parent, managing conservator, or guardian, and the affidavit must be notarized.
(c) A person claiming an exemption from a required immunization under this section may only obtain the affidavit form by submitting a written request for the affidavit form to the department.
(d) The department shall develop a blank affidavit form that contains a seal or other security device to prevent reproduction of the form. The affidavit form shall contain a statement indicating that the person or, if a minor, the person's parent, managing conservator, or guardian understands the benefits and risks of
immunizations and the benefits and risks of not being immunized.
(e) The department shall maintain a record of the total number of affidavit forms sent out each year and shall report that information to the legislature each year. The department may not maintain a record of the names of individuals who request an affidavit under this section.

Section 42.043, Human Resources Code:
(d) No immunization may be required for admission to a facility regulated under this chapter if a person applying for a child's admission submits one of the following affidavits:
     (1) an affidavit signed by a licensed physician stating that the immunization poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the child or a member of the child's family or household; or
     (2) an affidavit signed by the child's parent or guardian stating that the applicant declines immunization for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief.
(d-1) An affidavit submitted under Section (d)(2) must be on a form described by Section 161.0041, Health and Safety Code, and must be submitted not later than the 90th day after the date the affidavit is notarized.

 

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