Ratification of ‘Law of the Sea’ advances world government


Vice Adm. Robert R. Monroe (Ret.)
The Hill
July 18, 2012

Ratification of the United Nations Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST) would be a giant step toward World Government. The principal purposes of LOST are to
transfer technology and wealth from developed to underdeveloped nations and to increase exposure to international litigation. Consider two quotations
from LOST’s Preamble:

“…achievement of these goals will contribute to the realization of a just and equitable international economic order which takes into account the interests and needs of mankind as a whole and, in particular, the special interests and needs of developing countries,”

“.the seabed and ocean floor and the subsoil thereof, beyond the limits of national jurisdiction, as well as its resources, are the common heritage of
mankind, the exploration and exploitation of which shall be carried out for the benefit of mankind as a whole,”

Oceans and seas cover 70% of the earth’s surface. In the decades and centuries to come, the seabeds of this vast area – more than two-thirds of our planet – will become an immense source of oil, natural gas, and rare and essential minerals. If we do not ratify LOST, America will be free in the future – as in the past – to use our advanced technology, our enterprising spirit, and our national vigor to develop the seabeds of these waters as we choose. But if we ratify LOST, many aspects of our exploration, development, and production of these resources will be controlled by the bureaucracy established by this treaty. And we will be required to pay LOST many billions, possibly trillions, of dollars in fees, royalties, and profit-sharing.

This Senate vote will determine our nation’s future: continued American sovereignty or subordination to global governance. The international authority created by LOST is virtually limitless, covering executive, legislative, and judicial functions. The treaty itself has 320 articles and six annexes. It creates: an International Seabed Authority with a Council, an Assembly, and a Secretariat; an Economic Planning Commission and a Legal and Technical Commission; the Enterprise, which governs those areas which – to us today – are international waters; and a Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and a Seabed Disputes Chamber as judicial bodies.

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