The migration tsunami that swamped Europe with 1.5 million “refugees” in 2015 is roaring back with a tidal wave that may be double the size of last year’s deluge.

In fact, most citizens of the European Union countries appear to be unaware that their unelected and unaccountable rulers at the European Commission, in their own European Economic Forecast  report issued last fall, announced precisely that. That is, they projected (with apparent acceptance and approval) that three million refugees/migrants would arrive in Europe in 2016.

The warming spring/summer weather along the Mediterranean now means calmer seas are returning, which means many of the hundreds of thousands of migrants encamped along Africa’s northern coast, particularly in Jordan and war-wracked Libya, will soon be headed to Greece and Italy on boats.

According to a recent report for Spiegel International Online, website of the German daily Der Spiegel, the double whammy projected by the EU Commission is already starting out to be, actually, a triple or quadruple whammy, in terms of magnitude in comparison to 2015. “Europe continues to focus primarily on the war refugees coming from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan,” notes Der Spiegelcorrespondent Walter Mayr. “But it is often forgotten that increasing numbers of people from countries south of the Sahara are trying to head north as well. In 2015 alone, according to the European Union border control agency Frontex, 108,000 Africans made their way illegally to Europe. That represents an increase of 42 percent over 2014 — and experts believe the total is but a harbinger of what Europe may soon be facing.”

“In March alone, Italy registered 9,676 refugee arrivals — four times more than in March 2015,” wrote Mayr. “Even more alarming, refugees from Syria and Afghanistan — groups that have been most affected by the closure of the Balkan Route — haven’t yet returned to the path across the central Mediterranean,” Der Spiegel reports. “Currently, the migrants arriving in Italy mostly come from Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal and Guinea, despite the fact that their asylum applications are likely to be rejected, as is the case for most of those coming from Africa. Less than 30 percent of asylum applicants from Nigeria or Mali, for example, can expect to have their asylum applications approved in the EU.”

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