Former Pentagon boss Donald Rumsfeld emerged from the shadows on Tuesday to warn about the threat posed by the Islamic State.

“We’re going to have to find ways to reduce the funding for radical Islamists, we’re going to have to find ways to limit their recruiting successes, and that means we’re going to have to compete worldwide with a very powerful, apparently attractive strain of that faith,” Rumsfeld told Morning Joe.

Rumsfeld is one of the primary architects of the invasion of Iraq. On September 15, 2001, four days after the attacks on New York and Washington, he suggested invading Iraq because he was concerned about the availability of “good targets in Afghanistan.”

Challenged on the Bush administration’s insistence despite a lack of evidence that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and collaborated with al-Qaeda, Rumsfeld infamously quipped there “are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know. “

In 2011 Rumsfeld peddled a book titled after this quote. In it he writes he made a “misstatement” about the existence of weapons of mass destruction sites around Baghdad and Tikrit. He said the statement, which was one of the primary justifications for launching the invasion, was one of a number of occasional “imperfect formulations.”

The illegal 2003 invasion resulted in more than a million dead Iraqis, one-fifth of the country’s population, and cost $1.7 trillion with an additional $490 billion in benefits owed to war veterans, expenses that will likely grow to more than $6 trillion with interest over the next four decades, according to the Costs of War Project by the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University.

The war created a humanitarian crisis by displacing around 4 million people, destroyed the Iraqi economy which resulted in a 60 percent unemployment rate, destroyed the country’s cultural heritage, fostered ethnic and religious tension resulting in sectarian violence and provided, with the Help of Rumsfeld’s Pentagon, a breeding ground for ISIS and eventually the Islamic State.

“I can’t tell you if the use of force in Iraq today would last five days, or five weeks, or five months, but it certainly isn’t going to last any longer than that,” Rumsfeld told Steve Croft of CBS Radio Connect in November, 2002.

Although the US claims the war end in December, 2011, the current Defense Secretary, Ashton Carter, said from the globalist summit in Davos, Switzerland last week the US is “looking for opportunities to do more” in Iraq and Syria and will send 3,600 troops to serve as trainers and advisors to the Iraqi Security Forces.

“Rumsfeld blames Iraq for not avoiding being attacked,” writes David Swanson in a review of The Unknown Knowns, a film on Rumsfeld by Academy Award winning documentarian and filmmaker Errol Morris. “He pretends Iraq pretended to have weapons, even while blaming Iraq for not turning over the weapons that it claimed not to have (and didn’t have).  The veteran liar lies that he thought he was using the best ‘intelligence’ when he lied about Iraqi weapons, and then passes the buck to Colin Powell.”

Donald Rumsfeld’s remarks on the Islamic State and the commitment he insists is required by the United States should be put within the context of the invasion of Iraq and the lies perpetuated by the government of the United States.

Follow Kurt Nimmo on Twitter: https://twitter.com/kurt_nimmo


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