The head of Russia’s election observation body has sensationally accused the British government in Westminster of rigging the Scottish Independence vote, asserting that there were more ‘yes’ votes than ‘no’ votes despite the no campaign claiming victory.

Following a political battle that captured global attention, the ‘Better Together’ campaign beat off their pro-independence adversaries in securing a 55%-45% success after yesterday’s voting, meaning Scotland stays a part of the United Kingdom.

However, in a move undoubtedly tied to Moscow’s increasing hostilities with the British government, which vehemently backed the ‘no’ campaign, the head of one of the country’s top election observer groups controversially claimed today that the vote was fixed.

Speaking to RIA Novosti, Georgy Fyodorov, the head of the Kremlin-aligned Association for the Protection of Electoral Rights, stated that, “According to what our observers at the polling offices tell us, there were more Yes votes during the vote count.”

Fyodorov went further, remarking, “Scotland found itself under immense pressure… Those on the UK side campaigning for a No vote resorted to every violation imaginable.”

His sentiments were echoed by Igor Morozov, a member of the Council of the Federation Committee for Foreign Affairs, although Morozov stopped short of claiming the entire referendum was rigged.

“We can see that, with the exception of Glasgow, those supporting independence failed to register a majority. I think that Westminster propaganda played a great part in that. I suppose it is down to information put out in recent weeks, from the party leaders, [that had impact on the vote], thanks to that the Scots arrived at the result they have,” Morozov said.

Fyodorov did not specify precisely what ‘violations’ occurred, although as we reported earlier, some ‘yes’ supporters have drawn attention to sporadic examples which appear to show ‘yes’ votes being miscounted and added to the ‘no’ tally, although such allegations remain unproven.

In the final weeks of the campaign, the British government displayed panic at the fact that polls showed the gap between the two camps narrowing, with the ‘yes’ campaign even taking the lead at one point. Had the referendum gone the other way, the impact on Westminster would have been monumental, with many speculating that Prime Minister David Cameron would have been forced to resign.

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