Emily Alpert Reyes
Los Angeles Times
November 18, 2013

College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania study finds. / image via Wikimedia Commons
Students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania study finds. / image via Wikimedia Commons
College students who cheated on a simple task were more likely to want government jobs, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania found in a study of hundreds of students in Bangalore, India.

Their results, recently released as a working paper by the National Bureau of Economic Research, suggest that one of the contributing forces behind government corruption could be who gets into government work in the first place.

For instance, “if people have the view that jobs in government are corrupt, people who are honest might not want to get into that system,” said Rema Hanna, an associate professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. To combat that problem, governments may need to find new ways to screen people seeking jobs, she said.

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