On Monday (Nov. 14) at 6:15 a.m. EST, the moon will arrive at its closest point to the Earth in 2016: a distance of 221,524 miles (356,508 kilometers) away. This distance, which is measured from the center of the Earth to the center of the moon, is within 85 miles (137 km) of the moon’s closest possible approach to Earth; to be sure, this is an extreme perigee.

Two hours and 37 minutes after perigee (the moon’s closest point to Earth), the orb will officially turn full. In recent years, the media has branded full moons that coincide with perigee as “supermoons,” and this month’s full moon will likely get a lot of extra attention since it will be the closest since Jan. 26, 1948.

So be prepared. It is certain that there will be considerable ballyhoo over this particular full moon. (I wonder if there will be somebody who will dare call this a “Super-duper-moon?”)

The full moon won’t approach this close again until November 2034, although there were even closer full moons in January 1912 and January 1930.

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