Stanley Fischer came to the Federal Reserve in the spring with a higher profile than any vice chairman in the 100-year history of the institution after leading Israel’s central bank and holding top jobs at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen pushed for him to be her No. 2 in a move that was viewed as a show of confidence and strength as she prepares to lead the Fed through one of it most challenging periods, managing the wind down of massive stimulus programs put in place following the financial crisis.

The pairing was dubbed a central banking “dream team” by Fed watchers.

In his first six months on the job, Fischer has rewarded Yellen’s confidence by helping communicate the Fed’s policy moves to nervous financial markets while publicly defending the central bank against a growing chorus of critics. To many on Wall Street he helped alleviate worries about the lack of direct financial market involvement on her résumé.

“Stan Fischer has market experience and goodwill that Chair Yellen doesn’t have,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank. “It’s not a slam on the Fed chairman, it’s simply different experience.”

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