Vitamin D insufficiency promotes chronic disease and increases risk of early death by 50 percent


John Phillip
naturalnews.com
October 18, 2012

Medical researchers have been sounding the alarm about the importance of maintaining optimal vitamin D levels from childhood through to the adult years, but millions of aging adults remain grossly deficient in this critical hormone-based nutrient. Vitamin D has demonstrated efficacy in preventing diseases from cancer to cardiovascular disease and dementia. Every cell in the body is now known to have vitamin D receptors where the nutrient provides an essential key to accurate DNA and cellular replication.

A research team from Wake Forest School of Medicine has published the results of an important study on vitamin D and disease risk in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (JCEM). The study purports that low levels of vitamin D and high levels of parathyroid hormone are associated with increased mortality in older African American and Caucasian adults. Prior studies on the effects of low vitamin D levels have been conducted on persons of European origin, but this study distinguishes important differences in disease risk between blacks and whites.

Low vitamin D levels are a significant risk factor for disease development and early death

The lead study researcher, Dr. Steven Kritchevsky noted “We observed vitamin D insufficiency (defined as blood levels less than 20 ng/ml), in one third of our study participants. This was associated with nearly a 50 percent increase in the mortality rate in older adults… our findings suggest that low levels of vitamin D may be a substantial public health concern for our nation’s older adults.”It’s important to note that while sun exposure provides a plentiful supply of circulating vitamin D during our younger years, continual warnings to avoid the sun and a natural tendency to produce less of the prohormone from sun exposure as we age, places older adults in a dangerously depleted state.


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