Over a decade since Infowars first warned that corporations were spying on users without their knowledge or consent via microphones and cameras embedded in devices, it has now emerged that Apple’s Facetime feature is doing precisely that.

What is being described as a “bug” was uncovered yesterday after it was revealed that a caller can get access to a recipient’s microphone and camera in real time if the recipient presses the power button on an iPhone while receiving the call. This is typically done to silence or ignore an incoming call.

“Apple’s glitch appeared to be quite disturbing as many people on social media put the tech colossus to shame for failing to prevent such a glaring security flaw,” reports RT. “Several posts suggested blocking the app over fears of spying.”

Apple responded to the controversy by disabling Group FaceTime calls and promising to offer a software update to fix the bug later this week.

In an article first published over 12 years ago, we warned that “Private industry and eventually government is planning to use microphones in the computers of an estimated 150 million-plus Internet active Americans to spy on their lifestyle choices and build psychological profiles which will be used for surveillance and minority report style invasive advertising and data mining.”

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In 2014, we also reported on how Samsung’s own privacy policy stated that a user’s personal conversations will be recorded by the device’s microphone and transmitted to third parties.

In 2015 it also emerged that Google’s Chrome browser had begun remotely installing audio-snooping code that was capable of listening to users.

It is important to emphasize that whereas now people have become accustomed to the notion of being spied on by their own devices, back in 2006 such beliefs were viewed as fringe paranoia.

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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor at large of Infowars.com and Prison Planet.com.


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