The deep state is panicking over Joe Biden’s admission that he threatened to bankrupt Ukraine unless its government fired a prosecutor investigating his son’s “questionable business activities there,” according to radio host Dan Bongino.

Bongino also suggested that Biden’s allies in the media are pushing the ongoing whistleblower story claiming that President Trump is guilty of wrongdoing by making undisclosed promises to Ukraine in an attempt to deflect attention away from Biden, who admitted he threatened Ukraine into firing its top prosecutor who was leading a corruption probe.

“They’re… panicking over Joe Biden’s actions in Ukraine to block the investigation into his son’s questionable business activities there,” he tweeted on Friday. “The latest anti-Trump intel leak about the ‘promise’ to a foreign gov’t is CLEARLY an effort to intimidate Trump into backing away.”

“The latest intel hit on Trump tells me that the deep state swamp rats are in a panic over the Ukrainian/Obama administration collusion about to be outed in the Inspector General report,” he also tweeted on Thursday. “They’re also freaked out over Biden’s shady Ukrainian deals with his kid.”

What’s not helping Biden is that he actually admitted he threatened to withhold $1 billion from Ukraine if it didn’t fire its top prosecutor, Viktor Shokin, who was then leading a corruption probe into a natural gas firm whose board included Biden’s son Hunter.

“I said, ‘You’re not getting the billion.’ I’m going to be leaving here in, I think it was about six hours. I looked at them and said: ‘I’m leaving in six hours. If the prosecutor is not fired, you’re not getting the money,’” Biden admitted, recalling his conversation with then-Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko while he was vice president. “Well, son of a bitch, he got fired.”

“And they put in place someone who was solid at the time.”

Interestingly, the New York Times even suggested that the “wrongdoing” by President Trump might not even be illegal, stating that some legal experts said “it was not obvious” how a conversation between the president and a foreign leader could meet the legal standards for a whistleblower complaint deemed an “urgent concern” by the inspector general:

Under the law, the complaint has to concern the existence of an intelligence activity that violates the law, rules or regulations, or otherwise amounts to mismanagement, waste, abuse or a danger to public safety. But a conversation between two foreign leaders is not itself an intelligence activity.

And while Mr. Trump may have discussed intelligence activities with the foreign leader, he enjoys broad power as president to declassify intelligence secrets, order the intelligence community to act and otherwise direct the conduct of foreign policy as he sees fit, legal experts said.

This would explain why President Trump was smug to reporters who were asking him about the whistleblower story.

“You’ve had a very bad week, and this will be better than all of ’em, this is another one,” the president told reporters. “So keep playing it out because you’re gonna look really bad when it falls, and I guess I’m about 22 and 0 and I’ll keep it that way.”


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