Chick-Fil-A broke its longstanding rule and served fried chicken to thousands of stranded passengers on a Sunday after the world’s busiest airport shut down for hours without power.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport lost power Sunday afternoon, causing over 1,000 flights to be grounded.

Atlanta’s mayor Kasim Reed called the fast-food chain asking for assistance, prompting the company to “immediately mobilize” and deliver free sandwiches to an emergency operations center to be distributed to stranded passengers.

“It has been a very difficult day for thousands of travelers,” Chick-fil-A spokeswoman Amanda Hannah said. “And while Chick-fil-A is always closed on Sunday, our restaurants open occasionally to serve communities in need.”

“We do not make a profit,” she added, “but do what we can to offer comfort to people experiencing hardship.”

Chick-Fil-A is closed on Sunday due to the founder Truett Cathy’s Christian belief that Sunday is the Sabbath, the day of rest.

The fried chicken chain is often criticized by the left for its stance on gay marriage and pro-Christian business practices.

For example, food critic website Eater.com released a scathing review of Chick-Fil-A for its stance on gay marriage over the summer.

Although critic Ryan Sutton said the review was intended to report that Chick-Fil-A made a “pretty average chicken sandwich,” he couldn’t help but inject politics into the review by attacking the company’s religious beliefs.

“I’m also here to report that it’s the only top 10 quick-service restaurant that doesn’t mention sexual orientation in its online equal opportunity statement, and that it holds a zero rating on LGBT benefits and worker protections from a prominent advocacy group. McDonald’s scored 100,” Sutton wrote.

And earlier this year, an LGBT group tried to get Chick-Fil-A banned from the Catholic Duquesne University claiming the chicken restaurant was a threat to LGBT safety.


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