I recently learned that CNN, which uses Darth Vader’s voice to call itself “the most trusted name in news” without the slightest apparent sense of irony, recently gave Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) a hard time about appearing on Infowars.

I was simply astounded by the nerve of these 2-bit hack fraud “journalists” over at the Counterfeit News Network! Doesn’t it seem like people who live in glass houses have been throwing a lot of rocks lately?

The whole thing reminds me of the situation that my wife and I had with the Cable News Narcissists over the summer, before my story first appeared on Real News with David Knight. At the time, Charlie Gard’s situation was plastered all over both traditional and social media.

Charlie was the British baby boy born with a rare form of mitochondrial disease. To get the facts straight, which Communist National News rarely bothers to do since actual journalism is actual work, mitochondrial disease, or “mito,” isn’t actually as rare as many people believe and espouse, but Charlie’s specific form of it was.

Doctors at the Great Ormond Street Hospital in the U.K., who were not especially familiar with mito nor qualified to treat it, were very quick to give up on Charlie yet they refused to let his parents bring him to see actual mito specialists elsewhere. Now, you may be asking yourself, “How could they stop Charlie’s parents from bringing him to see other doctors? They’re his parents right?”

Well, it’s called a “medical kidnapping” and it happens all the time. There were probably dozens if not hundreds of medical kidnappings in America just today and it’s not only children who end up as hostages.

In Charlie’s case though, the doctors at the Great Ormond Street Hospital said that no matter where his parents wanted to bring him and no matter which specialists they wanted to have treat him, he had no chance to survive. Further, they claimed that Charlie was suffering and that it would be inhumane to keep him alive and even more inhumane to try to move him. So, the hospital went to court in the U.K. to overrule Charlie’s parents and pull the plug.

Charlie’s parents posted the story and pictures of Charlie online. Thousands, if not millions of goodhearted strangers supported them. In very short order over 1.3 million British pounds were raised to pay for medical flights and an experimental mito treatment which held promise. That’s about $1.9 million.

Before long, Pope Francis offered to have Charlie treated at the Children’s Hospital in the Vatican and President Trump tweeted:

But the Great Ormond Street Hospital, with the courts backing it, still wouldn’t let Charlie’s parents take him.

Meanwhile, my wife and I had been trying to speak out with an idea: If the hospital wouldn’t let Charlie’s parents bring him to be examined by the mito specialist, then fly the mito specialist to Charlie. We felt that if Charlie were examined by mito experts who said it was possible to save his life, the hospital would come under a great deal of scrutiny to let him go.

We looked at the media outlets who were covering Charlie’s story. CNN was one of them.

We pitched CNN reporter Susan Scutti. We showed her the articles by Michelle Malkin and Rolling Stone which had just been published the week before about how I defended the life of Justina Pelletier, a 15-year-old American girl who had been medically kidnapped by Boston Children’s Hospital, which refused to treat her for mito too. We offered CNN the exclusive.

My wife Dana explicitly told Scutti, emphasis added:

So, imagine our surprise three days later when we found this story written by Scutti published on CNN.com called, “Could Charlie Gard’s case happen in the United States?” with sections called “‘Unlikely’ situations in the United States,” “‘A one in a zillion chance?'” and “‘Even in Texas.'”

Unlikely? Yeah, it’s so unlikely in America that we have a significant number of attorneys who specialize in the area, Facebook pages about it, numerous articles by competent journalists, and even a news outlet called MedicalKidnap.com where you can find thousands of such stories each profiling a real-life family like Charlie’s to which this has actually happened.

But Scutti and her Cockamamie News Network apparently didn’t bother to speaking to any of them or to my wife and I — or to any mito experts who could have told them that caring, competent parents lose custody of their children all the time due to this nonsense. No, that’s the type of thing real journalists would do. Like Infowars did:

And as for “‘a one in a zillion chance?'” what is a zillion? How many zeroes is a zillion, exactly? Fake news, fake numbers folks.

Scutti even painted a fake dichotomy — and the difference between the EU and the U.S. is that in the U.S. our courts are actually ordering treatment over parental objections. She spoke to so-called “medical ethicists” who know nothing of value about mito and who have probably never treated a patient in their lives. To them, apparently all treatments are created equal. However, the reality is that it matters which particular treatment is being ordered, as any American family which has been a victim of medical kidnapping can tell you.

For example, in Justina’s case, the court ordered her treated for a psychological condition that she never really had and meanwhile, without her mito meds, she deteriorated from a competitive figure skater to a girl in a wheelchair racked by constant agony. And she’s still in a wheelchair today — even though the court “ordered treatment” for her.

The worst part is that there are a lot of American kids out there like Justina and baby Charlie and that medical kidnappings go very under-reported by mainstream outlets like CNN who have large audiences and who could have helped these children and their families, if only they would do their homework and use a little elbow grease. Instead, in this case, CNN did great damage to these families by telling millions of others that they probably don’t exist.

That’s a shame. And by the time I was able to speak out at the Daily Wire, it was too late for Charlie. That’s a tragedy. If mito specialists could have examined him earlier, they reported there might have been something that they could have done.

And giving someone a hard time on the air because they’ve appeared on Infowars — which by the way did a far more accurate job covering my story than Rolling Stone and numerous other mainstream outlets — is total hypocrisy — and fake news.


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