In order to combat growing obesity in the country, France has decided to ban unlimited refills on sugary drinks.

While they added a tax hike in 2012 to drinks with excess sugar, a move many countries have been eyeing to help reduce obesity, the government has now made it illegal for restaurants or food services to sell unlimited sugary drinks at a fixed price.

In addition to banning unlimited soda, French officials have also put a cap on unlimited fruit drinks, sports drinks and vegetable drinks which contain a large amount of sugar.

Currently, at least half of French people are overweight.

Only 15% are listed as obese, which is less than half the amount of obese adults in the United States.

According to the latest government reports, over one third of adults in America have a BMI over 30.

In addition to taxing sodas, France has undertaken other measures to ensure that their obesity problem does not catch up to other developed countries around the world.

For example, in 2004, vending machines in schools were prohibited from selling anything but water or fruit juice.

In 2011, ketchup was stricken from school cafeterias and French fries were only allowed to be served once per week to students.

The United States, which currently ranks as one of the fattest countries in the world, comes in at number 10 behind several Middle Eastern countries.

Despite this health crisis, which contributes to higher instances of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and other problems, many United States courts have refused to enact such extreme measures in our own country.

For example, a bill to attempt to limit the amount of soda consumed at New York City stadiums was recently rejected by courts.

But are these measures working in France?

While the rate of obesity is steadily climbing across the world, the French do consume less soda than most other countries.

According to statistics, French people drank 65.5 liters of soda per capita in 2015 compared to their neighbors across the Channel in the United Kingdom, who guzzled 106.6 liters of soda per capita.

But will this new ban be enough to to stop the battle of the bulge? If so, would other countries follow suit?


Related Articles