Polish leaders have made clear their position on the EU ‘refugee resettlement’ agenda, saying that they will not get involved in the “social disaster” of hosting migrants, and that Germany must “bear consequences” for a crisis Angela Merkel is controlling.

“We have not opened Europe for refugees – Ms. Merkel has,” said Jarosław Kaczyński, founder and leader of Poland’s ruling Law and Justice Party (PiS). “And it is Ms. Merkel and Germany that have to bear the consequences, not Poland.”

In related statements, he explained that migrants bring with them an increase of violent crime and sexual assault, and that Poland’s response would only invite louder accusations of ‘fascism’ or ‘Nazism’ from leftists and EU officials, who are already calling the Polish government “dictatorial.”

“If we want to stop the wave of aggression on part of immigrants, at least toward women, we would have to use some sort of punitive measures,” he said. “If we use punitive measures, it would immediately turn out that we are seen as Nazi.”

“This is a vicious circle. We simply cannot get involved in this.”

Kaczyński added that welcoming migrants sets in motion a “mechanism that cannot be stopped afterward” and creates a “kind of a social disaster.”

Recent polling indicates that 73% of Polish citizens are against taking in migrants, with nearly half saying they “strongly oppose” the idea.

“The current threats coming from the EU and directed at Poland among others, are an attempt to mask bad EU decisions and to blame the consequences on member states,” said Polish President Beata Szydlo. “Blackmail and threats are not a good solution here.”

Szydlo warned that accepting thousands of migrants would alter Polish culture and degrade the current status of safety and security, as it has in countries like France and Sweden, adding that a “good and effective migration policy that will help people. The solution is not endlessly taking in migrants to Europe.”

Polish Interior Minister Mariusz Błaszczak responded to EU threats of sanctions if they do not comply with resettlement demands, asserting that migrants pose a greater risk to Poles than economic penalties enforced by the failing superstate.

“We mustn’t forget the terror attacks that have taken place in Western Europe, and how – in the bigger EU countries – these are unfortunately now a fact of life,” he said. “Remember that the now very numerous Muslim communities started out as relatively small numbers.”

“The policy of multiculturalism in Western Europe is bringing about a bloody harvest in the form of terrorist attacks,” Błaszczak said last month. “Our predecessors, agreeing to receive thousands of refugees – and de facto immigrants from the Middle East, and northern Africa – were striving to bring about such a crisis.”

“The policy of multiculturalism in Western Europe is bringing about a bloody harvest in the form of terrorist attacks.”

Poland finds itself aligned with nearby Hungary, which has also taken a firm stance against EU pressure and is facing a similar backlash from Brussels.

Hungarian prime minister, Victor Orban, recently warned that the survival of Europe hangs in the balance, with immigration and defense of national borders being the most critical issues.

“Today we live in a time when international politics is a battlefield,” he said. “The independence and freedom of European nations are at stake, and at the center of the battlefield is migration.”

Dan Lyman: Facebook | Twitter


Related Articles


Comments