A London Guardian journalist was accused of advocating riots in response to a news story about how police wouldn’t be able to cope with a new wave of civil unrest in the United Kingdom.

Damien Gayle, whose bio describes himself as a “general news reporter for the Guardian,” tweeted “you know what to do” in response to a Guardian story headlined, “Police would struggle to deal with repeat of 2011 riots, senior officer warns“.

Numerous Twitter users alleged that Gayle was inciting riots to achieve a political goal.

“LOOK: Guardian reporter. Setting up their own coverage of future riots to enable take down of TM,” tweeted journalist Katie Hopkins.

“Outrageous and if not a criminal offence it should be. At the very least The Guardian should sack him,” responded one user.

“The hard left. Willing to do anything to bring down the government. It is despicable and must be utterly utterly rejected by Labour,” added another.

Others defended Gayle, with one user claiming that he was, “Merely pointing out the risks of police cuts.”

After the tweet, Gayle put his Twitter account on lockdown so it was only accessible to confirmed followers. Gayle regularly writes stories for the Guardian, including numerous articles about the Grenfell tower fire, which some on the left have attempted to hijack for political ends.

Given the Guardian’s distinctly left-leaning outlook, the purpose of encouraging riots would be to create the kind of chaos that would force the resignation of Prime Minister Theresa May or even the overthrow of the Conservative government.

So-called ‘day of rage’ protesters marched on Parliament earlier this week with the express purpose of “overthrowing the government,” although attendance was tiny and the demonstration fizzled.

Huge riots swept England back in the summer of 2011 as mass looting gripped many major cities during unrest that lasted for several days.

By the time the chaos had ended, five people were dead and more than 3,000 arrests had been made. Around 48,000 businesses suffered financial losses as a result of the rioting, with the Association of British Insurers paying out in excess of £200 million.

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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor at large of Infowars.com and Prison Planet.com.


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