A preliminary decision by an adviser to the EU’s top court could set an unfavorable precedent for Hungary, Slovakia and their allies as a heated legal battle brews between Brussels and Eastern European nations over ‘refugee’ resettlement quotas.

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) – the highest court dealing with EU laws – has been recommended to reject arguments brought forth by Budapest and Bratislava, who contend that mandatory quotas are unlawful.

“The contested decision automatically helps to relieve the considerable pressure on the asylum systems of Italy and Greece following the migration crisis in the summer of 2015 and… is thus appropriate for attaining the objective which it pursues,” said the ECJ’s Advocate General, Yves Bot, in Luxembourg on Wednesday.

The EU’s Commissioner For Migrant Affairs, Dimitri Avramopoulos, praised Bot’s opinion, saying, “None of the arguments they put forward justify that they don’t implement the relocation decision.”

“One thing is very clear: relocation works if the political will is there,” he added. “Our objective is and remains to ensure that the people eligible are relocated by end September 2017.”

Hungary and Slovakia have both responded to Bot’s ruling, with Hungarian Justice Minister, Pal Volner, stating, “The main elements of the statement are political, which are practically used to disguise the fact that there are no legal arguments in it.”

“We claim that the decision approved by the Council of Interior Ministers is at odds with the European Council’s decision that the mandatory quotas will not be adopted,” said Slovakian President, Robert Fico, in a statement, adding that Bot’s decision is “non-binding.”

While Bot’s recommendation to the ECJ is not legally binding, the court generally follows the counsel of its advisers and could officially rule against Hungary and Slovakia when it produces a final judgment in the coming weeks – a decision which will reverberate throughout the European Union as the exploding migrant crisis threatens to tear the superstate apart.

An alliance of anti-migrant nations continues to grow in number and momentum, with Hungary, Slovakia, Poland, and the Czech Republic spearheading the budding coalition.

Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orban, has been the most outspoken leader to challenge the ‘refugee’ resettlement agenda, regularly accusing Brussels of working in concert with what he calls the ‘George Soros mafia network’ of intertwined government bodies, NGOs, and media outlets to force the creation of a “new, mixed, Muslimized Europe.”

“We have to stand our ground against the Soros mafia network and the Brussels bureaucrats,” Orban said during a recent speech in Romania. “We will have to fight against the media they operate.”

Orban vowed that “Western European Christians will always be able to find security.”

“The main target of the inquisition, the example of national governance to be weakened, destroyed and broken is Poland,” he warned. “Hungary will use every legal possibility in the European Union to be in solidarity with the Poles.”

Dan Lyman: Facebook | Twitter


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