Ex-FBI Director James Comey may actually face prosecution due to the growing evidence suggesting he lied to Congress and dabbled in corruption, according to a lawmaker.

Comey’s congressional statements under oath claiming there was no coordination between Obama’s Department of Justice and the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton are being contradicted by evidence suggesting otherwise, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) pointed out.

“We have emails that would suggest that the testimony was false, and at best misled the American public,” he said on Thursday. “At worse he was lying to Congress.”

Furthermore, Meadows didn’t mention this, but it’s worth pointing out that Comey expected Clinton to become president – he admitted it in his new book – so it’s possible that he didn’t fear repercussions from lying to Congress beforehand.

But, unfortunately for Comey, Clinton isn’t the president and the new-found evidence is damning.

“…Here we are today with emails, text messages, that says that even the no coordination message that Director Comey put out on that infamous day in July 2016 [exonerating Clinton] was actually suggested by the Department of Justice,” Meadows continued. “There is another email from the Department of Justice that would indicate that, on how to articulate the exoneration of Hillary Clinton.”

“So as you go further from another source, other than [texts between] Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, within the Department of Justice, we now know that the edits that they had given edits to Director Comey, or at least the emails would suggest that.”

Comey is also under fire because many of the memos he leaked to the press contained classified information, which, ironically enough, is basically the same crime he investigated Clinton for in terms of using a private e-mail server to share classified materials.

In one of the memos, Comey claimed that in Feb. 2017, President Trump asked him to end the investigation into ex-National Security Adviser Michael Flynn.

“The White House has repeatedly crossed lines that other administrations have been reluctant to cross when discussing politically charged criminal investigations,” wrote the New York Times.

However, three months later, on May 3, 2017, Comey told the Senate Judiciary Committee that the FBI under his watch had never been asked to stop an investigation for a “political reason.”

During the Senate testimony, Comey confirmed to Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) that in theory, the Attorney General or senior officials at the Department of Justice could stop a FBI investigation.

The former FBI director added it would “be a big deal to tell the FBI to stop doing something that – without an appropriate purpose.”

“But I’m talking about a situation where we were told to stop something for a political reason, that would be a very big deal,” he said. “It’s not happened in my experience.”

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