Movie criticism ain’t what it used to be.

Film critics once served audiences by telling them if a movie was worth their hard-earned cash. Some critics still cling to that approach.

Others use their forums to promote their ideological agendas. And, since the vast majority of film critics lean left, the results are predictably woke.

That’s less of a problem for critics who work for progressive sites like The Nation or Mother Jones. Their audiences expect a hard-left look at film. The same holds true for conservative National Review readers checking out the latest from Kyle Smith.

Other critics toil for allegedly neutral sites but heap their political baggage onto the readers’ laps. Which brings us to TheWrap.com.

The site’s review of The Secret Life of Pets 2 must be read to be fully believed. The film sequel follows the further adventures of Max (Patton Oswalt), Gidget (Jenny Slate) and Duke (Eric Stonestreet).


The City of Leander will close the public library Saturday as they allow a Drag Queen Story Hour event to proceed on the premises with ANTIFA announcing they will “defend the event”. Alex exposes how this LGBTQ insanity on full display is designed to corrupt the next generation.

The site’s review reads like a parody of the trend under discussion. A kiddie film, we’re told, isn’t acceptable unless it checks a set number of cultural boxes.

The Secret Life of Pets 2, on the other hand … effectively acts as an animated ode to heteronormativity, toxic masculinity and patriarchal worldviews, passed off as harmless plot points to entertain young audiences.

This is a children’s movie review, mind you.

The critic clutches a swinging set of pearls over Secret Life’s “conservative” messaging. That’s a non-starter, apparently.

Pets 2’s descent into the bowels of what reads as conservative messaging begins as Katie (voiced by Ellie Kemper), Max’s owner, randomly meets a young man, quickly marries and has a child. In this fictional universe, that’s clearly the only natural progression of events in a woman’s life. That trope is later reinforced through the pet characters.

We’re also told a film can be criticized for what’s NOT on screen as well as what’s visible.

In case it wasn’t obvious, Pets 2 makes no attempt at diversifying the notion of what a family is today. No same-sex couples are in sight as pet owners, much less as parents. Nothing that deviates from the default straight married couple is even hinted at.

Of course, had a same-sex pet couple existed, it might not have pushed enough social justice points to truly qualify as progressive.

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