The most destructive fire in California’s history has caused hundreds of thousands to evacuate their homes and so far killed 25 people, prompting President Trump to declare a state of emergency.

The Camp Fire burns in the hills on November 10, 2018 near Big Bend, California. Fueled by high winds and low humidity the Camp Fire ripped through the town of Paradise charring 105,000 acres, killed 23 people and has destroyed over 6,700 homes and businesses. The fire is currently at 20 percent containment. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

MAGALIA, CA – NOVEMBER 09: A Cal Fire firefighter monitors a burning home as the Camp Fire moves through the area on November 9, 2018 in Magalia, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

MAGALIA, CA – NOVEMBER 09: A Cal Fire firefighter sprays water on a home next to a burning home as the Camp Fire moves through the area on November 9, 2018 in Magalia, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

PARADISE, CA – NOVEMBER 10: A view of a mobile home park that was destroyed by the Camp Fire on November 10, 2018 in Paradise, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The Camp Fire that leveled the entire city of Paradise is but one of three major wildfires that firefighters are fighting to contain. Further south, the Hill and Woolsey fires tore through Malibu, causing 250,000 people to evacuate the area.

MALIBU, CA – NOVEMBER 09: Embers falls from burning palms and the sun is obscured by smoke as flames close in on a house at the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 in Malibu, California. About 75,000 homes have been evacuated in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to two fires in the region. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

MALIBU, CA – NOVEMBER 09: Embers falls from burning palms and the sun is obscured by smoke as flames close in on a house at the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 in Malibu, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

“It really seems like we are chasing it, it moves so fast, so aggressive, and the fire behavior is just so intense,” said Mike Grosenbach, a Los Angeles County firefighter.

MALIBU, CA – NOVEMBER 09: The Woolsey Fire approaches homes on November 9, 2018 in Malibu, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

MALIBU, CA – NOVEMBER 09: Flames surround a house during the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 in Malibu, California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

TOPSHOT – A man watches as the Woolsey Fire reaches the ocean along Pacific Coast Highway (Highway 1) near Malibu, California, November 9, 2018. – About 75,000 homes have been evacuated in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to two fires in the region. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP/ Getty Images)

Trump blamed forest mismanagement for the wildfires Saturday, threatening to pull federal funding if the state didn’t properly look after its forests.

“There is no reason for these massive, deadly and costly forest fires in California except that forest management is so poor. Billions of dollars are given each year, with so many lives lost, all because of gross mismanagement of the forests. Remedy now, or no more Fed payments!”

THOUSAND OAKS, CA – NOVEMBER 09: Horses are spooked as the Woolsey Fire moves through the property on Cornell Road near Paramount Ranch on November 9, 2018 in Agoura Hills, California. (Photo by Matthew Simmons/Getty Images)

MALIBU, CA – NOVEMBER 09: Mayor and firefighter Rick Mullen surveys a house that is on fire in Malibu as the Woolsey Fire comes down the hill Friday. (Photo by Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

A firefighter is silhouetted by a burning home along Pacific Coast Highway (Highway 1) during the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 in Malibu, California. – About 75,000 homes have been evacuated in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to two fires in the region. (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

The National Weather Service extended a Reg Flag Warning, indicating a high risk of continued wildfires, until Tuesday.

A Google interactive map shows over a dozen fires raging from Southern California to Oregon.



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