Kurt Nimmo

Infowars.com

May 27, 2010

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John McCain worked overtime to make sure Vietnam POWs never came home.

Appearing on the Alex Jones Show today, Paul Craig Roberts talked about the shameful abandonment of POWs by the U.S. government. Roberts mentioned an article by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sydney Schanberg posted on the American Conservative website entitled McCain and the POW Cover-Up.

“John McCain, who has risen to political prominence on his image as a Vietnam POW war hero, has, inexplicably, worked very hard to hide from the public stunning information about American prisoners in Vietnam who, unlike him, didn’t return home,” writes Schanberg. “Throughout his Senate career, McCain has quietly sponsored and pushed into federal law a set of prohibitions that keep the most revealing information about these men buried as classified documents.”

Schanberg notes there is overwhelming evidence — official documents, radio intercepts, witness depositions, satellite photos — of soldiers left behind in Vietnam. McCain has insisted this evidence was “woven together by unscrupulous deceivers to create an insidious and unpatriotic myth” about the U.S. government. According to McCain, the evidence consists of nothing more than the “bizarre rantings of the MIA hobbyists,” “hoaxers,” “charlatans,” “conspiracy theorists,” and “dime-store Rambos.”

Schanberg’s articles serve as yet more evidence that the government does not give a whit about its soldiers or for that matter its citizens. Government cannot be trusted. It attracts the worst sort of psychopaths and criminal opportunists. John McCain is with them.

According to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein (The Final Days, Ch. 14), Rockefeller minion and high level globalist Henry Kissinger referred pointedly to military men as “dumb, stupid animals to be used” as pawns for foreign policy.

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Once again, John McCain, a favorite of the global elite, has demonstrated his capacity for treason.

The following article blurbs contain links to the original articles.

McCain and the POW Cover-Up

Sydney Schanberg

John McCain, who has risen to political prominence on his image as a Vietnam POW war hero, has, inexplicably, worked very hard to hide from the public stunning information about American prisoners in Vietnam who, unlike him, didn’t return home. Throughout his Senate career, McCain has quietly sponsored and pushed into federal law a set of prohibitions that keep the most revealing information about these men buried as classified documents. Thus the war hero who people would logically imagine as a determined crusader for the interests of POWs and their families became instead the strange champion of hiding the evidence and closing the books.

Read entire article

Silent Treatment

Sydney Schanberg

From the beginning, nearly 40 years ago, the evidence was in plain sight. For reasons unexplained, however, the mainstream press did not acknowledge it and has continued to ignore it to this day.

I’m referring to the evidence that North Vietnam—after the peace treaty had been signed on Jan. 27, 1973 in Paris—held back hundreds of American prisoners, keeping them as bargaining chips to ensure getting Washington’s promised $3.25 billion in war reparations. The funds were never delivered, and the prisoners were never released. Both sides insisted to their people and the world that all POWs had been returned, challenging the voluminous body of facts to the contrary.

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Was Rambo Right?

Sydney Schanberg

In the closing days of the 2008 presidential campaign, I clicked an ambiguous link on an obscure website and stumbled into a parallel universe.

During the previous two years of that long election cycle, the media narrative surrounding Sen. John McCain had been one of unblemished heroism and selfless devotion to his fellow servicemen. Thousands of stories on television and in print had told of his brutal torture at the hands of his North Vietnamese captors, his steely refusal to crack, and his later political career aimed at serving the needs of fellow Vietnam veterans. This storyline had first reached the national stage during his 2000 campaign, then returned with even greater force as he successfully sought the 2008 Republican nomination. Seemingly accepted by all, this history became a centerpiece of his campaign. McCain’s supporters touted his heroism as proof that he possessed the character to be entrusted with America’s highest office, while his detractors merely sought to change the subject.

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