Search
Search Results

No Search Results Found

LIVE
Search
Search Results

No Search Results Found

Explore HomeNewsPodcastsBreaking NewsSocial Watch Live Infowars NetworkThe Alex Jones ShowThe War Room with Owen ShroyerThe American Journal More Banned.VideoInfowars StoreArchiveRSSDownload Our App

Terms of Service

DMCA

Advertise with us

Affiliates

Media Inquiries

About

Science & Tech

Google is The Search Engine That Censors The Most “Conspiracy Theories”

by Cindy Harper | Reclaim The Net
December 13th 2021, 5:07 am
Nothing surprising.
Image Credit:
Beata Zawrzel/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Share
Share
Fund the InfoWar. Donate Now!
Keep up to date with our latest:
Email
Sign Up Now
Have an important tip? Let us know.Email us here.

The idea that Google was actively and manually censoring its search engine results was something that was itself once classed as conspiracy.

But new research has shown that Google does in fact manually manipulate its search results for content, more than rivals such as DuckDuckGo, Bing, and even Russia’s Yandex.

RelatedPrivate search engines

In fact, Russia’s Yandex is the search engine that has censored some “conspiracy theories” the least, according to new research.

On Wednesday, researchers from the University of Zurich published a study claiming that Yandex promotes “conspiracy theories” more than any other search engine. The research involved the top five search engines; Google, Yahoo, Bing, DuckDuckGo, and Yandex.

As myocarditis and vaccine injuries mount in the wake of Covid Vaccine Tyranny. The stark reality of the sterilization of an entire generation begins to appear on the horizon of sovereign nations worldwide. Meanwhile, the Democrats do the bidding of their Bilderberg masters. Transforming the United States into a balkanized no go zone hellhole. As their pro crime movement accelerates and the economy is destroyed by design.

“All search engines except Google consistently displayed conspiracy-promoting results and returned links to conspiracy-dedicated websites in their top results,” the researchers found.

“The search engine with the highest proportion of conspiracy-promoting content was Yandex.”

The researchers used bots to perform searches for six terms; “new world order,” “George Soros,” “Illuminati,” “QAnon,” “9/11,” and “flat earth.” They then analyzed the first-page results from each search engine. To make it look like real-world behavior, the researchers used computer servers from three different locations and the searches were performed on two different days.

On Yandex, 65% of results were links to websites and articles promoting what the researchers call “conspiracy theories.” 25 to 40% of the results on Yahoo, Bing, and DuckDuckGo also promoted “conspiracy theories.” Google had close to no “conspiracy theories” on the first page, meaning it’s the most censored.

“While it can be assumed that only users who are already interested in conspiratorial content purposefully navigate to the dedicated niche websites, their appearance in top search results, especially for queries that do not denote conspiracy theories per se (e.g., “9/11” or “George Soros”) can potentially lead to incidental exposure to conspiracy theories. This is troubling, given people’s high trust in search results,” the researchers wrote.

Be sure to join Alex Jones and Infowars on GETTR! Save the future and join the next Renaissance by following these NEW accounts for breaking news and exclusive information today!
FEATURED BANNED VIDEOS
In case you missed it...
Science & Tech

Science & Tech

US Airlines Call for No 5G Near Airports, Warn of ‘Catastrophic Disruption’

posted 13 hours ago

Science & Tech

Bill Would Give U.S. Government ‘Kill Switch’ in All New Cars

posted 2 days ago

Science & Tech

Jordan Peterson Steps in to Defend Joe Rogan as Scientists Sign Letter Condemning His COVID Claims

posted 2 days ago

Science & Tech

America’s Food Supply Fertilized With Human Remains And Coated With Nanoparticles

posted 3 days ago

View More From Science & Tech
Terms of ServiceDMCAAdvertise with usAffiliatesMedia InquiriesAbout