Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
August 19, 2010

infowarstruck.jpg
Alex Jones and Infowars.com have repeatedly advised against defacing private property in order to express political ideas and opposition to the government.

In an obvious effort to discredit Alex Jones and Infowars.com, vandals have spray-painted “Infowars.com” and messages about fluoride on private property in Millcreek Township, Pennsylvania.

WPMT Fox 43 in York, Pennsylvania, covered the vandalism. Fox’s anchor insinuates Infowars.com is behind the incident.

It is almost assured the graffiti is the work of either agents provocateurs or misguided individuals who do not respect private property or have a tagger mentality. It is a 90% chance, however, the vandalism is an effort to discredit Alex Jones and Infowars.com.

Alex Jones and Infowars.com have repeatedly advised against defacing private property in order to express political ideas and opposition to the government.

In 2009, during the Obama as the Joker poster campaign, Infowars.com specifically instructed activists not to put posters up on private property. “Obama Joker posters should be posted in public commons where other fliers, public announcements, handbills, etc., are posted. Please do not post on federal or private property as this will be considered vandalism and will be counterproductive and diminish the message of the Obama Joker poster,” Infowars.com wrote on August 5, 2009.

In the last few months, the underhanded campaign to derail the growing patriot movement has taken on a desperate momentum.

Earlier this month, a Democrat operative connected to Jack Conway, a Democrat running against Rand Paul in Kentucky, was outed at a political event. Tyler Clay Collins dressed up like a Rand Paul supporter and bashed immigrants in an attempt to discredit the Republican candidate. Collins’ outrageous stunt was followed by a fallacious story published by GQ claiming Paul had kidnapped a woman and tried to force her to take drugs as part of a fraternity ritual.

  • A d v e r t i s e m e n t
  • {openx:49}

In April, Jason Levin, an Oregon technology consultant, created a website urging opponents of the Tea Party movement to attend rallies and events and engage behavior designed to discredit the movement. Levin’s website encouraged opponents to infiltrate the movement and do things that will “further distance them from mainstream America and damage the public’s opinion of them.”

There are numerous cases of groups and individuals engaging in property damage and other destructive stunts in order to demonize their opponents. For instance, earlier this year a Jewish student at George Washington University was caught putting swastikas on her dorm room door. The student admitted responsibility after she was caught in the act by a hidden camera placed by the police.

The government has a long and sordid history of infiltrating political groups in a concerted effort to discredit them. The FBI created COINTELPRO for this specific reason. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover said COINTERLPRO was launched specifically to “neutralize” the civil rights movement, Martin Luther King, and the anti-war movement. “Agents and informers did not merely spy on political activists. Their main purpose was to discredit and disrupt. Their very presence served to undermine trust and scare off potential supporters,” writes Brian Glick.

In 2007, Canadian police were caught red-handed at the Security and Prosperity Partnership summit in Montebello, Canada, acting as violence-prone anarchists.

Fresh food that lasts from eFoods Direct (Ad)

Finally, the corporate media has specifically targeted Alex Jones. In 2009, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and a gaggle of so-called liberal bloggers attempted to link cop shooter Richard Poplawski to Jones. “Believing most media were covering up important events, Mr. Poplawski turned to a far-right conspiracy Web site run by Alex Jones, a self-described documentarian (sic) with roots going back to the extremist militia movement of the early 1990s,” Dennis R. Roddy wrote for the Post-Gazette.




Related Articles


Comments