WASHINGTON, D.C. – Claims by Corey Lewandowski and David Bossie in their new book Let Trump Be Trump incorrectly attribute Steve Bannon with being responsible for bringing to the second presidential debate in St. Louis, MO., on Oct. 9, 2016, three women who for years have accused former President Bill Clinton of sexual assault or rape, when the idea was properly the brainchild of Roger Stone.

On pages 212-213 of their book, Lewandowski and Bossie write the following:

Breitbart got his start as a conservative media marksman with Matt Drudge and the Drudge Report right around the time of the Monica Lewinsky scandal.  He was well versed in the history of Bill Clinton’s lurid sexual affairs.  And by association, so was Steve Bannon.  So it was of no real surprise that Bannon came up with the idea of bringing the Clinton accusers to St. Louis.

Lewandowski and Bossie continue the narrative by claiming David Bossie was attuned to the vulnerability of the Clintons to the testimony of these women given Bossie’s experience producing the 2008 documentary, Hillary: The Movie, the film from which the Citizens United Supreme Court case had arisen.

On pages 213-214, Lewandowski and Bossie write:

    … no one was more certain than Dave that Hillary’s Achilles’ heel was her husband’s past.  for every woman who ever came forward to accuse Bill Clinton of rape or sexual harassment, there was a check to a private detective with a Hillary connection.  It wasn’t enough that she made these women pipe down, she dragged them through the mud and shattered their reputations while she was at it.

Setting the record straight on this point is important in that Democrats in Congress and their partisan journalist supporters in the mainstream media have begun recirculating sexual allegations from the 2016 presidential campaign against President Trump in light of the sexual abuse admissions of leftist notables, including Harvey Weinstein, Sen. Al Franken, and Rep. John Conyers.

Stone’s email to Bannon, dated Sept. 26, 2016

To verify that he was responsible for the idea, Stone provided Infowars.com with a copy of an email he sent to Bannon, dated Sept. 27, 2016.

Stone’s email to Bannon was entitled “Indiscretions?”

The email read as follows in its entirety:

DJT [Donald J. Trump] needs to understand quickly that the issue of Clinton and women is not about “indiscretions” or ” infidelity”.

The issue is sexual assault, violence and rape.

This is why it is essential to launch Broaddrick, Willey, Jones and others.

All willing plus Shelton and Kyle.

G. Flowers wrong metaphor. Consensual sex.

Women vs. Hillary must be launched.

Have converted women’s op [opposition] to c-4 [501(c)(4)]

No disclosure-need funding

She set herself up last night

He gave her a pass.

Later spoke to reporters about Clinton “indiscretions “- an area where he has vulnerabilities himself.

Better fix this quickly

END EMAIL________________________________

On Friday, Sept. 23, Trump had begun a series of attacks on Hillary Clinton over Bill Clinton’s “sexual indiscretions.”

Stone’s memo was clarifying that the issue with Bill Clinton’s sexual history did not involve “indiscretions” but sexual violence against woman, as had been demonstrated in the Paula Jones case.

On Nov. 14, 1998, Bill Clinton settled out-of-court for $850,000 the Paula Jones lawsuit in which Bill Clinton’s long-time extra-marital paramour Paula Jones agreed to drop her sexual assault case against Clinton.

The 501(c)(4) that Stone suggested creating was never actually formed, given the fast-moving final weeks of the 2016 presidential campaign.

The Clinton sexual assault victims that Stone mentions in the memo are Juanita Broaddrick, Kathleen Willey, Paula Jones, Kathy Shelton, and Dolly Kyle.

Bannon was receptive to Stone’s solution, which may explain why Lewandowski and Bossie thought Bannon was responsible for coming up with the strategy.

Stone acknowledges that Candice Jackson, author of the 2015 book Their Lives: The Women Targeted by the Clinton Machine, assisted him in contacting the women and organizing the event.

Hillary campaign charges Trump with sexism

The background of Stone’s memo was a stepped-up attack by the Clinton campaign, charging Trump with sexism and harassment of women.

At the first presidential debate, held at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, Hillary attacked Trump for being a sexist, launching a surprise attack on Trump for his treatment of beauty pageant contestant Alicia Machado.

Here is how Roger Stone described the incident on pages 207-208 of his book The Making of the President 2016:

As [NBC Nightly News host] Holt started to ask his final question, Hillary interrupted, delivering her sexism attack, the second punch of the two-punch response she wanted to deliver on Trump for having dared raise the “stamina issue.”

Hillary cut in aggressively, “Well, one thing Lester, is you know, he tried to switch from looks to stamina but this is a man who is called women pigs, slobs, and dogs, and someone who has said pregnancy is an inconvenience to employers.”

When Trump tried to object, Hillary barely paused to take a breath.

“… who has said women don’t deserve equal pay unless they do as good a job as men and one of the worst things he said was about a woman in a beauty contest, he loves beauty contests, supporting them and hanging around them.  And he called this woman Miss Piggy,” Hillary said, looking pleased she got a chance to deliver the attack on script. “Then he called her Miss Housekeeping because she was Latina. Donald, she has a name.”

“Where did you find it?” Trump asked.

“Her name is Alicia Machado and she has become a U.S. citizen and you can bet she’s going to vote this November.”

On Labor Day, Sept. 11, 2016, Clinton suffered a fainting incident generating a dramatic video that went viral, showing Hillary, collapsing as two security men grabbed her and lifted her into her black SUV, with Hillary apparently unconscious.

Just before Hillary’s “Miss Piggy” attack during the first debate, Trump had charged that Hillary lacked “the stamina” to be president, a clear reference to her widely-viewed fainting spell.

Then, on October 7, 2007, two days before the second presidential debate, the Washington Post reported the newspaper had obtained a video showing Donald Trump bragging in vulgar terms about kissing, groping and trying to have sex with women during a 2005 conversation caught on a hot microphone, saying that “when you’re a star, they let you do it.”

While the newspaper did not disclose how the eleven-year-old video had been obtained, it clearly captured audio of Trump talking with “Access Hollywood” host Billy Bush, on a bus with the show’s name written across the side, arriving on a Hollywood set to tape a segment with Trump.  Among other banter with the tabloid host before the two emerge from the bus to go the set, Trump can be heard boasting about kissing women and grabbing women by their sexual organs.

Stone’s memo to Bannon, dated Sept 26, 2016, was intended to lay out a counterattack strategy.

By that date, Stone had grown increasingly concerned the Clinton campaign planned to make attacking Trump over various sexual indiscretions a major issue in the final weeks of the 2016 presidential campaign.

Stone implements his plan

On page 222 of his book Making of the President 2016, Stone explains the surprise press conference he organized prior to the start of the second presidential debate.

On Sunday night, Oct. 9, 2016, prior to the start of the second presidential debate, Trump invited the press to a pre-debate press conference. The press who showed up were surprised to find Trump hosting a panel of three women who have accused Bill Clinton of sexual assault or rape – Paula Jones, Kathleen Willey, and Juanita Broaddrick. 

Paula Jones was arguably Bill Clinton’s most prominent and tenacious sexual assault victim. On November 14, 1998 Clinton paid Jones $850,000 to settle the case, after “more than 4 ½ years of scorched-earth legal warfare.”

Kathleen Willey has alleged Bill Clinton sexually assaulted her in the Oval Office on November 29, 1993.

Juanita Broaddrick, a former nursing home administrator, alleged that Bill Clinton, when he was Arkansas Attorney General, sexually assaulted her in a hotel room in April 1978.[1] 

Fox News noted Trump posted the video of the press conference in St. Louis, Missouri, to his Facebook page less than 90 minutes before the second debate was scheduled to begin.

In the next paragraph, Stone explains his strategy in conducting the surprise news conference:

The point of the press conference was not to argue Bill Clinton’s well-known history of marital infidelity to his wife, Hillary.  The point was that Paula Jones, Kathleen Willey, and Juanita Broaddrick have all accused Bill Clinton of criminal sexual assault and rape.  In attrition, all three women have argued Hillary Clinton is equally guilty in her husband’s sexual crimes, in that Hillary is an accomplice-after-the-fact – an enabler – who regularly attacks and threatens Clinton’s sexual assault victims in order to silence them.

Also present was Kathy Shelton.  Hillary Clinton had defended the man who had raped Shelton in 1975 when she was only 12-years-old.

Stone managed to get the women seated prominently in the gallery across from Bill Clinton during the debate.

On page 229 of The Making of the President 2016, Stone detailed how Trump referenced the women during the debate.

Next, Trump expanded the attack to Hillary, arguing she was an accomplice to Bill’s sexual crimes.  “Hillary Clinton attacked those same women and attacked them viciously,” Trump said.  “Four of them here tonight. One of the women, who is a wonderful woman, at 12 years old, was raped at 12. Her client she represented got him off, and she’s seen laughing on two separate occasions, laughing at the girl who was raped. Kathy Shelton, that young woman is here with us tonight.”

This set up the distinction Trump wanted to draw, making it clear there was proof the Clintons had committed sexual crimes while there was no proof he had ever done so.  “So, don’t tell me about words,” Trump said with emphasis.  “I am absolutely — I apologize for those words. But it is things that people say. But what President Clinton did, he was impeached, he lost his license to practice law. He had to pay an $850,000 fine to one of the women. Paula Jones, who’s also here tonight.”

Trump began to get an audible, positive audience reaction.  “And I will tell you that when Hillary brings up a point like that and she talks about words that I said 11 years ago, I think it’s disgraceful, and I think she should be ashamed of herself, if you want to know the truth,” Trump said, completing his argument.  The transcript showed the debate was interrupted by audience applause at this point. Stone’s surprise press conference was a key moment in the 2016 presidential campaign reversing the “war on women” attack from a question of Trump’s “indiscretions” and what Trump was accusing were Bill and Hillary criminal sexual crimes.

Stone’s surprise press conference was a key moment in the 2016 presidential campaign reversing Hillary’s “war on women” attack, moving the news ‘narrative’ from questions about Trump’s “indiscretions” to Trump’s accusing Bill and Hillary with sex-related crimes.

Roger Stone’s 2015 book, The Clintons’ War on Women

What Lewandowski and Bossie appear to have failed to appreciate was the fact Roger Stone had been working on this issue for years, as evidenced by the 2015 publication of his book, The Clintons’ War on Women.

Stone’s 2015 book anticipated Hillary Clinton, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential candidate, would expand the “GOP war on women” accusations from the moral issues of opposing late-term abortions, to the identity politics issues on which Hillary planned to run, billing herself as breaking the glass ceiling to become the “first woman president” of the United States.

Even in 2015, Stone was determined to change the terms of the debate, arguing that Bill and Hillary’s sexual crimes were of an order of magnitude different than “sexual indiscretions” or unsubstantiated allegations that might be made against a GOP candidate like Donald Trump.

Stone’s point in The Clintons’ War on Women was that various cases, including the Paula Jones and Monica Lewinsky cases, provided proof Bill Clinton was a repeat, serial sexual criminal with a history of rape and physical violence in his sexual past.

Stone also intended to explain how Hillary was an accomplice-after-the-fact to Bill Clinton’s sexual crimes by her execution of a systematic plan to discredit any and all of Bill Clinton’s sexual victims who dared to come forward. Hillary aided and abetted Bill’s crimes by lying about the accusations, smearing the victims, and unleashing other accomplices willing to threaten these victims with physical harm if they persisted.

“This book doesn’t focus on Monica Lewinsky, Whitewater, or the Clinton pardons,” Stone wrote in the introduction to his 2015 book.  “Instead, it’s about the many, many ways in which the Clintons have been tied to sexual abuse, cover-ups, strong-arm tactics, drugs, lies, and the intimidation of victims.  As Bill and Hillary have climbed to power, the people left in their wake have been silenced – until now.”

In the introduction on page 19, Stone leveled the accusation directly and sharply:

“The Clinton’s activities have not only included Bill’s physical rape of women, but also Hillary’s degradation and psychological rape of the women whom Bill has assaulted.”

David Bossie’s documentary Hillary: The Movie was groundbreaking, and not just for the Supreme Court decision, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission.  In the spirit of full disclosure, this author was honored to have played a small role on camera in that documentary.

But in the battle shaping up to charge Donald Trump yet again with issues of his sexual past, the Deep State operators should be well advised they will face adversaries not just in Bill and Hillary’s numerous sexual abuse victims, but also in determined political warrior Roger Stone, whose revelations about Clinton crimes and corruption have exposed the truth to the American public, and in ways that every citizen can understand and appreciate.


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