Investment guru Jim Rogers, a former colleague of George Soros, has warned governments are seeking to end the use of cash to implement a surveillance state where your every expense is monitored.

Jim Rogers, who co-founded the Quantum Group with globalist billionaire George Soros in 1973, noted that many governments around the world are cutting back on the amount of paper currency in circulation.

“Governments are always looking out for themselves first, and it’s the same old thing that has been going on for hundreds of years,” he said during an interview with the MacroVoices Podcast. “The Indians recently did the same thing. They withdrew 86 percent of the currency in circulation, and they have now made it illegal to spend more than, I think it’s about $4,000 in any cash transaction.”

“In France you cannot use more than, I think it’s a €1,000.”

Following the Charlie Hebdo terror attack in 2015, the French government prohibited cash payments of more than €1,000, with then-Finance Minister Michel Sapin arguing it was necessary to “fight against the use of cash and anonymity in the French economy.”

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi withdrew 500- and 1,000-rupee bills as legal tender, removing 86 percent of the country’s currency bills from circulation.

The European Commission recently issued a “road map” to implement severe restrictions and reporting requirements on the use of cash across the European Union, with the final goal of eliminating the use of cash all together.

Rogers warned the trend by governments to eliminate the use of cash for economic transactions is part of a larger effort by those governments to implement a surveillance state by directly monitoring the spending habits of its citizens.

“Many countries are already doing this,” he said. “Some states in the US you cannot make cash transactions above a certain amount. Governments love it.”

“Then they can control you.”

“If you want to go and buy a cup of coffee, they know how many you drink, where you buy them, etc., if they can all put it into electronic formats and they will,” he added. “The world is all going electronic.”

Despite assurances made by governments that the replacement of cash with a digital currency will make economic transactions easier, Rogers warned they are a distraction to cover-up the elimination of basic freedoms.

“When it’s done, the governments are going to be very, very happy they are going to say they’re doing it for our own good, this is not them, this is for our good,” Rogers added. “That they’re doing this, but it’s coming, and it’s going to be a whole different world in which we live.”

“Probably we are not going to have as many freedoms as we have now even though we are already losing our freedoms at a significant pace.”


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