This year, Campus Reform has reported how college campuses around the country have been forced to modify various holiday celebrations due to concerns over political correctness.

Whether it was warning students of cultural appropriation on Halloween, or restricting Christmas celebrations for fear of offending non-Christians on campus, universities have become increasingly fearful of allowing “offensive” holiday celebrations.

But what about a seemingly harmless, non- (or at best quasi-) religious holiday like Valentine’s Day? While most universities have yet to take action against the day, would students be willing to outlaw it if they felt their peers were offended by the celebration?

To find out, Campus Reform went undercover at Cornell University, armed with a fictitious petition to ban Valentine’s Day, on the grounds that it was simply too offensive to students without a romantic partner.

It quickly became clear that students at Cornell were more than willing to go along with any measure that would supposedly make campus a more inclusive space.

“That’s a really nice petition,” said one student, while another admitted, “I’m in a relationship, but I totally understand.”

One student condemned the school’s handling of the holiday in the past, saying “I would also point out the administration is really heteronormative about [Valentine’s Day] which is kinda f***** up.”

One student went so far as to ask for our contact information, so they could share the fabricated petition online to gain more supporters.


Related Articles


Comments