Trump was criticized in 2017 for suggesting that social justice warriors would target George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, but now they’re doing just that, proving the president right.

Students at Hofstra University are now demanding the removal of a Thomas Jefferson statue to “correct for history,” and are also demanding politically-correct training for its professors and facility.

“Hofstra University students held their second annual ‘Jefferson Has Gotta Go!’ protest of a Thomas Jefferson statue on campus on Friday, demanding that the university move the structure into a museum along with the “appropriate context,'” reported Breitbart. “The Jefferson statue, which has also been subjected to acts of vandalism in the past, stands in front of the university’s student center — a location that some students have expressed frustration over, stating ‘it is unfortunate’ that so many students and families ‘take photos and share hugs and smiles’ in the presence of the Jefferson statue.”

Furthermore, students at George Washington University want to remove the school’s mascot, George the Colonial.

Contrast this to 2017, when President Trump was criticized for suggesting that both Jefferson and Washington would be targeted for removal.

“This week it’s Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson is coming down,” Trump said about the removal of two Confederate statues at the time. “I wonder, is it George Washington next week and is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?”

The president was criticized over those comments by two historians, one of whom said making an equivalency between the Founding Fathers and Confederate leaders was not only “absurd” but also “unacceptable for the president of the United States.”

“They accomplished something very important. Washington and Jefferson were central to the creation of a nation … Lee and Stonewall were not being honored for those types of accomplishment,” he said. “They were being honored for creating and defending the Confederacy, which existed for one reason, and that was to protect the right of people to own other people.”

Another historian also echoed similar sentiments, suggesting that a distinction must be drawn between Confederates and the Founding Fathers and stated that it’s hard to find 18th- and 19th- American leaders of great consequence who never owned slaves.

“It would be impossible to remember them if an association with slavery is the only criteria,” he said.

It would appear, however, that many college students are not drawing a line between the Founding Fathers and Confederate leaders; the campaign to remove Founding Fathers tributes seems to stem from an emotional – not a rational – argument.

The historians were asked to provide comment on these new developments but weren’t heard back from by the time of this publication.



Top political cartoonist in the world, Ben Garrison, has been attacked by the left for being so effective in his support for liberty, capitalism and President Trump.


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